Gallery: Hubble's greatest hits - 20th anniversary

Gallery: Hubble's greatest hits - 20th anniversary

Summary: The Hubble space telescope was a total bust after it was dropped from space shuttle Discovery 20 years ago. But some fine tuning turned it into a grand scientific achievement.

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TOPICS: Nasa / Space
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  • Taken from X-rays, visible light and infrared observations, this ACS composite image shows Kepler's supernova remnant radiation. Each color represents a different point on the light spectrum, including those usually invisible to the naked eye.

    Credit: NASA

  • In 2003, Hubble took a series of observations of the Sombrero Galaxy (aka M104), which is 50,000 light-years wide, over about a month's time. The galaxy lies on the edge of the Virgo galaxy cluster, 28 million light-years from the Earth. The Sombrero Galaxy is equivalent to 800 billion suns in mass.

    Credit: NASA

  • The Wide Field Camera 3 captured this still life of Stephan's Quintet, a group of five galaxies. At the top right is NGC 7319, a barred spiral, and those blue and red specks are clusters of thousands of stars. At the center are two galaxies that appear from this perspective almost as one, where there's "a frenzy of star birth" going on. At bottom left is NGC 7317, which NASA describes as "a normal-looking elliptical galaxy."??At upper left is the dwarf galaxy NGC 7320, where the blue and pink dots represent bursts of star formation. It's actually much closer to Earth (40 million light-years away) than the other four galaxies here.

    Credit: NASA

Topic: Nasa / Space

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