Gallery: ReadyBoost and flash drives

Gallery: ReadyBoost and flash drives

Summary: Is your USB flash drive, Compact Flash card, or SD memory fast enough to take advantage of Windows Vista's new ReadyBoost caching feature? Here's how to find out.

SHARE:
TOPICS: Windows, Microsoft
2

 |  Image 8 of 11

  • This older device is fast enough to use for occasional file transfers, but those read speeds are way too slow to deliver any performance benefit to a Windows Vista PC. It fails.

  • This 1GB drive from A-Data, purchased from an online outlet store, just failed to clear the minimum required write speed on the first test pass.

  • After retesting the previous drive, write performance cleared the minimum threshold, but this drive couldn't deliver that speed across the entire drive. Its design uses a single fast 128MB flash chip matched with slower flash chips. Because it couldn't deliver consistent results, ReadyBoost refuses to use it.

  • Thumbnail 1
  • Thumbnail 2
  • Thumbnail 3
  • Thumbnail 4
  • Thumbnail 5
  • Thumbnail 6
  • Thumbnail 7
  • Thumbnail 8
  • Thumbnail 9
  • Thumbnail 10
  • Thumbnail 11

Topics: Windows, Microsoft

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Related Stories

Talkback

2 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • published specs?

    Any quick way to determine ReadyBoost numbers/capability before buying flash drives? Any correlation between price and performance?
    Thanks,
    Scott
    analabor@...
    • No way I know

      Most mfrs list maximum sequential read times, which doesn't help with ReadyBoost.

      Go to the original post and scroll to the end, where you can find a list of drives that have passed the tests.
      Ed Bott