Hands-on look: BlackBerry PlayBook tablet

Hands-on look: BlackBerry PlayBook tablet

Summary: RIM held a special media-only event in New York City on Thursday showing off the new BlackBerry PlayBook. Here's a hands-on look.

SHARE:

 |  Image 9 of 13

  • Thumbnail 1
  • Thumbnail 2
  • Thumbnail 3
  • Thumbnail 4
  • Thumbnail 5
  • Thumbnail 6
  • Thumbnail 7
  • Thumbnail 8
  • Thumbnail 9
  • Thumbnail 10
  • Thumbnail 11
  • Thumbnail 12
  • Thumbnail 13
  • Users are free to switch the orientation on the tablet between portrait and landscape, and there is a lock on the home screen if users have a preference for one over the other.  In this view, you can see the apps on the bottom and toggling between the apps. Users can return to the home screen by sliding upward on the BlackBerry logo at the bottom and hit up the Settings by sliding downward from the top. 

  •  

    Note that the PlayBook will be available with three storage options: 16GB, 32GB and 64GB for $499, $599 and $699 respectively. Pre-orders are being accepted from Best Buy now.

  • Connectivity isn't bad on the PlayBook: Micro USB and Micro HDMI ports. This can be useful at home for watching movies on the big screen via HDMI or displaying videos at meetings. There's also a play/pause button on the top side of the PlayBook next to volume controls.

Topics: Tablets, Hardware, Laptops, Mobile OS, Mobility, BlackBerry

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Related Stories

Talkback

1 comment
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Too little. Too late. Too watered down.

    I'm a long time Blackberry user and systems administrator looking after several BES deployments. I have been using a 3G iPad for a year now. I have not held one of these in my hands yet but based on the published specifications and photos I would neither be buying one myself nor would I recommend it to anyone. Users want email and web surfing as the primary purpose and apps platform as the secondary purpose. Basically the requirement to wirelessly tether to a Blackberry handheld is kooky at best. This will be a disaster for RIM.
    anthonymaw