Images: Wilma heads north

Images: Wilma heads north

Summary: The record-setting storm makes its way northeast after pounding south Florida.

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TOPICS: Nasa / Space
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  • rain structure

    This image was taken by NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite on Oct. 20, when Wilma was a Category 5 storm. It shows the underlying rain structure of the storm.

    Blue represents areas with at least 0.25 inches of rain per hour. Green shows at least 0.5 inches, yellow at least 1 inch and red at least 2 inches.

    Watch the video.

  • water heat

    In order for a hurricane to form or gain strength, the ocean surface temperature must be 82-degrees Fahrenheit or warmer. On Oct. 20 the yellow, orange and red areas in this Aqua satellite image indicate areas where the water temperature was 82 degrees F or warmer. The ocean surface temperature surrounding Wilma was about 85 degrees F at the time.

  • wind speed

    Weather forecasters predict that Wilma's wind speed will increase in the near term, then gradually drop.

Topic: Nasa / Space

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