Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

Summary: After a five-month beta, Microsoft has finally delivered a Release Candidate for IE9. Here's what to look for.

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TOPICS: Browser, Microsoft
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Topics: Browser, Microsoft

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  • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

    I love it!
    russshoe@...
    • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

      @russshoe@...

      You must work for Microsoft. ;0)
      Compumind
      • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

        @Smart_Neuron
        And you must not work...
        ItsTheBottomLine
    • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

      @russshoe@... Perhaps you should marry it!
      Nyuk, nyuk!
      Roc Riz
      • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

        @Roc Riz

        Now ladies...
        port05
    • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

      @russshoe@... I also prefer IE against Firefox and Chrome
      eqlit
    • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

      @russshoe@... I love it, too.

      This is the fastest web browser currently available, as confirmed by Facebook's new test suite.
      Tim Acheson
    • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

      @russshoe@... They copied Chrome interface, but couldn't copy Chrome speed. Chrome is more responsive, faster and less buggy. Let's wait to see if when IE9 is stable it will get closer.
      BioNerd
      • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

        @BioNerd To be fair, Chrome wasn't totally original in its interface. Lets not forget that.
        jetsethi
  • It's IE

    PBBBBBTTT.....
    leskern
  • It surely looks impressive ...

    I might switch back to IE ... and get rid of these stupid chrome crashes which have increased a lot these days ...
    abhisheksrivastava3@...
    • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

      @abhisheksrivastava3@... Agreed. I really wanna know why Chrome is crashing so much these days. That s**t was really cool until they made it almost a Firefox clone. =P
      Nevellin
      • chrome crashes

        @Nevellin You may be getting automatic beta releases. This is an option to only get upgrade for major releases.

        Personally, I use Firefox. ;-)
        david08048
    • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

      @abhisheksrivastava3@... I had switched from Firefox to Chrome, and now to the IE9 Beta. Chrome just reads less pages correctly.
      experiment627
    • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

      @abhisheksrivastava3@... You must not be running the latest Chrome Browser. Try downloading the Beta and FYI.... Chrome is the only Browser that immediately restores a crashed tab, leaving the Browser Window OPEN. For the other browsers, a crashed tab means a crashed window and a crashed browser. Get your thinking cap oiled and greased to come out with a better lie.... I mean excuse! haha.... lol.....

      @Nevelin Beware!!! .....you have zero geek appeal and maybe a brain that can't decipher how to press 'Control Alt Delete' at the same time. To see that unlike any other browser, Chrome runs each tab or instance in it's own process. Try your bogus attacks on Grandma's or Blondes.... er maybe you are a blonde!?! ;)

      @experiment627... Reads less pages correctly? What? I think you need really check out what all the competition has to offer and why IE is still declining in usage Worldwide! The only browser with significant gains is Chrome and the reason is obvious. It's just plain FASTER! ....and the features in the Beta (which are more and better than IE9 RC) are amazing. We now have the first Browser App Store enabling features you can't get anywhere else. It now has the fastest accelerated rendering engine on the Planet. Pages don't scroll render or blotch to load, most everything w/ heavy traffic, is being stored up on Instant Servers (like previews on Google Search). So windows (tabs) POP UP Instantly!

      Try that on any other browser..... do your own Speed Test to see the difference. And Google Search is so fast...... Microsoft has been stealing it. Along with Google Earth Maps!
      i2fun@...
      • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

        @i2fun@...

        WoW. Desperate much? Keep trying to prove how an advertising company produces better software than the main software developer on the planet - apparently without any evidence at all.

        IE9 has set the new standard, Google may get there, but wishing doesn't make it so ;-)
        tonymcs@...
      • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

        BTW..... @ALL.... IE9 also claims to be running a new acceleration engine for 3D, etc. But..... like everything else at Microsoft (including some fake excuse for brains in blondes like Balmer!?! ...and secretary boob implants, it's all FAKE! ;)<br><br>It's fake 3D, like old games in scrollers on consoles windows XP. It's like Wista used to be and Windows7 still has some leftovers of because it's not a true live action 3D experience. They had to steal the transparency code from OpenGL (ok bought it, but stealing it is the truth.<br><br>But no problem, a group of the top Corporations in the world (IBM, Intel, Apple, Nvidia, ATI/AMD, Sony, Toshiba, Google, etc) took over OpenGL (Khronos Group, look it up) and now we have OpenGL ES 2.0 on the largest market of mobile devices on the planet (makes PC Windows installs pale by comparison). That my square headed fools is what is powering Chrome's Browser, as well as Sony PS3 (42 Million) and Nintendo Wii (84 Million). Making OpenGL the most widely distributed set of API's on the Planet! :D
        i2fun@...
      • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

        @i2fun@... I love Chrome and use it primarily. And it is set to automatically update.
        HOWEVER.
        I still run into web pages that only FF or IE will display correctly way more than I like. Between those two, IE seems to work best across all websites. I have preferred Chrome due to its speed and security. I suspect Chrome will still be more secure than IE9. So I will probably use Chrome first and then use IE if I run into problems. Which is my current practice. I seldom use FF anymore.

        Chrome does crash, not a lot but it does. More so in my opinion than IE. My family did not like FF. But they have embraced Chrome. It's simple and clean uncluttered interface appeals to them. So I'm no fanboy, I use Chrome primarily but it does have wrinkles.

        Your other claims are just bogus. Microsoft uses a totally different rendering and javascript engine.

        And for now. IE9 is the most standards compliant if that means anything to you. So "they's advantages an' dis-advantages ta each"
        DevGuy_z
      • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

        @DevGuy_z
        When CrApple used OpenGL coupled with some KDE think tank Devs to create OS-X's Quartz Extreme desktop, that was the first truly hardware accelerated desktop (circa 2003. Microsoft also said they were working on 3D Desktop acceleration around then. But nothing materialized from their promises until Vista was finally released. At first using some fake animations w/o true transparency, that at the time was only being done on OpenGL. Even Linux had a fully hardware accelerated desktop by late 2005 before Microsoft.

        It all boils down to POV (point of view) calculation differences of DirectX as opposed to OpenGL. OpenGL is older than DirectX and was developed mainly for the Graphics industry and is what is still used today industry wide. Microsoft never challenged it's dominance in this field. DirectX's main development purpose was GAMES! ....NOT DESKTOPS and certainly NOT the COMMERCIAL GRAPHICS PRODUCTION INDUSTRY, such as film animation, photo manipulation and creation. Here it's still OpenGL!

        DirectX uses calculation intensive PoV of calculating everything in the world around it constantly in 3D, while it all revolves around it's own PoV. Whereas OpenGL has always only calculated it's PoV as it revolves around it's environment. Only calculating what's directly in front it. Consequently OpenGL has far superior efficiency and performs less far less GPU intensive calculations than DirectX! ....it's that efficiency and speed that was completely rewritten in 2005-2006 to form the basis of OpenGL ES for Mobiles and what will be running on Chrome OS and is now inside Chrome Browser (WebGL uses this) that makes 3D CSS and 3D content pages POP Open in the blink of an eye. It is the main reason OpenGL ES 2.0 is the future of the web today!

        @tonymcs New Standard??? haha.... IE is still a joke as far as standards, speed and 3D CSS goes today!!!
        W3C Standards? haha.... you need to visit these pages and wiki to brush up on Browser Wars. Here's one page;
        http://www.quirksmode.org/css/quirksmode.html
        http://www.netmechanic.com/news/vol4/html_no22.htm

        But it still doesn't have all the truth about the W3C and Browser Wars. Mainly that the original XHTML engine had been written by open source engineers. So Microsoft naturally bristled at using it and developed their own. The W3C Group had some engineers working on it and it became KHTML engine for their Konqueror Browser. It along with Opera (at the time), were the only fully Standards based browsers. Consequently pages coded in Microsoft's butchered HTML and not tagged according to W3C Standards would fail to load on anything else and break the browser (still happening today).

        This was also part of the Microsoft Anti-Trust lawsuit and why they were forced to switch to a dual mode in 2000-2001 with IE6. Pages developed under the Quirks Mode only (IE Classic butchered design) were not being loaded properly in browsers like Opera, Mozilla (only fully Standards based browsers other than KDE's Konqueror browser. Webkit was an open source effort by CrApple to use KDE's Konqueror KHTML Standards based engine. It's now the basis of Opera, Safari and Chrome.

        So the old headaches first started by Microsoft being the only rogue member of W3C Standards Group has been giving people headaches ever since. Until all the content, only using Quirks Mode (or MS IE Classic CSS rendering) is gone, you'll continue to have problems in other browsers on these old antiquated deliberately tweaked for IE pages. After 10yrs we still have the Classic headaches from IE6 and before's chopped and formed fast food browsers from the War Era! lol.....
        i2fun@...
      • RE: Internet Explorer 9 Release Candidate: what's new, what's changed

        @i2fun@... "Chrome is the only Browser that immediately restores a crashed tab, leaving the Browser Window OPEN. For the other browsers, a crashed tab means a crashed window and a crashed browser"

        I think not. IE9 has been 'restoring' tabs for some time now.
        RDrrr