NASA spacecraft crashes into the moon

NASA spacecraft crashes into the moon

Summary: On Friday morning, NASA successfully rammed the LCROSS satellite and a probe into the south pole of the moon in an attempt to search for hidden pockets of ice.

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  • One of the first views of the moon from LCROSS.

    Credit: NASA

  • LCROSS gets closer - about 10 minutes away from impact.

    Credit: NASA TV

  • NASA organized LCROSS parties around the country for moon gazers to view the impact.

Topic: Networking

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42 comments
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  • Total Waste of Material

    Lets see, we explode a bomb and crash a satellite into
    the moon to try and confirm whether or not water is on
    it. And for what purpose? To make another return trip
    to the moon? To build space colonies? We don't have
    anything else to blow our money on?

    Answer: because we're still trying to find something
    tangible in the real world to prove Darwin right. Well, it
    doesn't take a space monkey to know that Darwinism is
    a losing proposition. But, hey, if it takes blowing up the
    moon to finally figure that out, then what's the address
    where I can donate the next load of C4? Maybe if we
    blow up enough moons and planets in search of the
    mythological missing links, someone will finally get a clue
    and stop the insanity. Until then, let the senseless
    demolition continue!
    PaulDerengowski
    • No...

      [i]"Answer: because we're still trying to find something tangible in the
      real world to prove Darwin right."[/i]

      It is readily apparent that you have absolutely no concept of scientific
      theory. No one is trying to prove Darwin is right about anything. What
      we understand about the universe is based on relative probability, the
      idea that the "right" answer is only as valid as the evidence that
      supports it.

      Only religion deals with absolutes.

      [i]"Well, it doesn't take a space monkey to know that Darwinism is a
      losing proposition."[/i]

      Nearly all evidence we've discovered points to evolution by natural
      selection as the most likely answer. There is currently no viable
      alternative theory. Not only is there fossil evidence, but evolution has
      been directly observed, tested, and measured.

      Last year, biologist Richard Lenski of Michigan State University
      concluded a 20 year experiment. Using Escherichia coli, a major
      change occurred around the 44,000th generation; the bacteria
      developed the ability to metabolize citrate. That's the equivalent of
      you being able to breath liquid chlorine (should the need of breathing
      liquid chlorine be beneficial to a species.)

      It's not just bacteria, but the tracking of the evolution of the CRC
      Delta-32 gene mutation is equally fascinating. A mutation, by the
      way, that makes people immune to HIV, bubonic plague, and host of
      other related, but deadly diseases.

      [i]"Maybe if we blow up enough moons and planets in search of the
      mythological missing links, someone will finally get a clue and stop
      the insanity."[/i]

      One has nothing to do with the other. In any event, several species of
      primitive hominids have been identified as potential candidates as
      common ancestors to both the human primate and other great apes.
      Most recently (and potentially the most important) was the discovery
      of "Ardi," a 4.4 million-year-old hominid found in Ethiopia. This
      particular species displayed characteristics of [i]both[/i] humans
      [i]and[/i] african apes.

      [i]"Until then, let the senseless demolition continue!"[/i]

      Yes, let it. Maybe even you will learn something.
      olePigeon
      • Say Pigeon ...

        Do I detect another (Non) Zealot?
        :)

        Sorry I just absolutely could not resist!
        use_what_works_4_U
        • No one said evolution is perfect. [nt]

          [nt]
          olePigeon
          • Obviously. (nt)

            nt
            ShadowGIATL
      • olePigeon

        Thank you for the wonderfully intelligent and well written reply and rebuttal. As I was just about to reply to that absurdity you spoke my mind. Have a good day.
        jckst@...
    • Re: Total Waste of Material

      Yes Paul, you are. To help explain it to someone of your mental prowess, I quote Brian Regan... "The big yellow one is the Sun!"
      6feet_
    • This isn't about evolution.

      No one suspects that there's life -- or anything [i]like[/i] life -- on the Moon.

      This is strictly about sending future manned missions to the Moon for long-term colonization and scientific research. And they launched a small satellite at the Moon, not a nuclear missile. This wasn't about destruction. It was about determining composition, similar to the way scientists slammed a projectile at a comet a few years back to determine [i]its[/i] composition.

      As to your Darwinism rant:

      If you'd picked up a book on evolution written after, say 1960, you'd realize that the idea that there's a single "missing link" has been discredited. Evolution doesn't look like a chain of links. It's a tree, with some species branching off into dead ends, and others branching off into other species that eventually branch off into modern species.

      I encourage you to do a little research on it. It's actually fascinating how many hominids [i]have[/i] been found in human ancestry. In no particular order:

      Homo habilis
      Homo rudolfensis
      Homo ergaster
      Homo georgicus
      Homo erectus
      Homo cepranensis
      Homo antecessor
      Homo heidelbergensis
      Homo rhodesiensis
      Homo neanderthalensis
      Homo sapiens (not to be confused with modern humans, Homo sapiens sapiens)

      There are more than enough genetic and morphological studies on these remains to demonstrate ancestry.
      bhartman36
    • What are you so scared of?

      This has nothing to do about "missing links" and everything to do about looking for water on the moon, in the hopes of moving out beyond the stars one day.

      What about this scares you? Darwinism a losing proposition? Are you afraid of what we may find?

      Or maybe afraid of what we will [i][b]not[/b][/i] find?
      GuidingLight
  • RE: (NASA spacecraft crashes into the moon)

    well if what you are saying about evolution is correct then where did 0 rheses negative people come from, seeing that 0 rheses negative people dont have the rheses monkey gene, does science have a solid theory for that in the evolution theory.
    samaran98
  • RE: (NASA spacecraft crashes into the moon)

    American flat earthers, creationists, intelligent designers, Elvis sighters, UFO nuts, 2012ers and so on are starting to worry me. On the other hand, the rocket scientists (literally)who are willing to junk up the moon with a wide variety of debris seem cut from the same mold as the rainbow shot physicists, and they worry me also.
    datadoc_z
  • RE: (NASA spacecraft crashes into the moon)

    ripp-off of tax payers money you people should be ashamed when so many are out of work to waist our, not yours, money
    bg john deen
    • what a waste of money

      i agree it is a serious waste of taxpayers money especially now. blowing up 79 million dollors on the moon just to see if water exists is a kick in the face to american taxpayers. we all love space exploration but this is not the time to use this kind of money on a dumb project like this. when the asshole governments of the world fix this planets problems first then use the money.
      samaran98
      • Maybe the two of you should actually read...

        Maybe the two of you should actually read about the LCROSS mission before whining and complaining.

        .52% is budgeted for NASA, that's 1/2 of 1 percent. If you ask me, that's not nearly enough.

        Maybe you should be complaining about the wooden toy arrow manufacturers being budgeted more than NASA.
        olePigeon
        • Save your breath.

          They're the type that are perfectly happy sitting around waiting for a single big rock to come along and kill us all.

          And yet they are the same ones who will be screaming and blaming the government for not having enough foresight to have off-planet colonies to save us from extinction right up until when the rock kills everything on the planet, from humans down to the smallest microbes.

          Predictable, and sad really.


          Hallowed are the Ori
          • Thank You!

            Yes! Someone who gets that it's not just about blowing billions of dollars to send people on joy rides and satisfy passing curiosity -- not that the second item there is a bad thing, and we've certainly spent far more for even less noble pursuits -- but a matter of survival of the species.

            But many people just seem so complacent to sit there and trust that they're completely safe, and anyone who says otherwise is just a bunch of paranoid alarmists, 2012 freaks, Heavens Gate nutballs, people just looking for excuses to waste THEIR money, what have you. They say the same thing when it comes to hurricanes, fires, floods, etc.: "The evil government wants to spend millions to protect us from a disaster that MIGHT save us from a disaster that MIGHT happen? What a waste when that can go toward (insert pet cause here)! Wait, now the disaster is happening, and I've lost everything? Where was the evil government when they could have prevented this horrible travesty that has fallen upon me?!" People won't get it until the disaster is upon us, and probability and history show that, when you sit in one place for too long, it's not a matter of if that will happen, but when. A disaster of a planetary scale, in our current state, could wipe out everyone, and, unlike in the movies, Bruce Willis nor the angel-like space aliens would be able to save us this time. Humanity would become an unnoticed footnote in the history of the universe, if that.

            Of course, I guess that would serve as some modicum of vindication for anti-Darwinism folks, when one thinks about it: a whole species with the capability to survive by spreading out and adapting, possibly the most evolved species on the planet, wiped out because it evolved into something too weak and complacent to do so.
            Whyaylooh
      • A waste of money...

        See
        http://www.sti.nasa.gov/tto
        for the consequences of NASA wasting money.
        Agnostic_OS
      • Waste of taxpayer's money?

        Well, if you think about it, research being done now will create thousands of jobs in the future, perhaps even millions when you get right down to it. After we begin colonizing the moon, how many folks do you think would complain about the 79 million we are investing now?
        jckst@...
      • what a waste of money

        "i agree it is a serious waste of taxpayers money especially now. blowing up 79 million dollors on the moon just to see if water exists is a kick in the face to american taxpayers. we all love space exploration but this is not the time to use this kind of money on a dumb project like this. when the ******* governments of the world fix this planets problems first then use the money."

        hehehe...Then will be NEVER!!
        TheCableGuyNY
      • If you realized the technolgy

        derived from the sapce program, and how it is now helping the world realize our impact apon this planet, then maybe you might have a change of mind.

        I do not think it a "kick in the face", I understand that things must move forward in parallel. We cannot stop everything just because we have a problem with one thing.
        GuidingLight