Photos: Phoenix lands on Mars

Photos: Phoenix lands on Mars

Summary: NASA has released the first raw images of the North Polar region of Mars that were taken by the Phoenix spacecraft shortly after it landed.

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TOPICS: Nasa / Space
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  • NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander successfully landed in the northern polar region of Mars and sent back its first pictures of the planet's surface. The landing area is expected to be covered with water-rich permafrost that the Phoenix will scoop up with its robotic arm and test for the presence of the chemical ingredients of life.

    The Phoenix touched down at 4:53 PT Sunday, extended it solar panels, and sent back its first pictures about two hours later. This false-color image shows the land around Phoenix. Following are the raw images sent back by the Phoenix.

    Find out more information about the Phoenix mission.

    Photo credits: NASA/JPL-Calech/University of Arizona

Topic: Nasa / Space

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23 comments
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  • phoenix landing on mars

    that is just so damn amazing.
    mdstuhr
  • RE: (Photos: Phoenix lands on Mars)

    seems like a pretty boring place.....
    LargeMarg
    • Vastitas Borealis

      Its not called the Vastitas Borealis (Vast North) for nothing. Most of the north is jsut flat planes you won't see any 4 kilometer high cliffs for a good few hundred/thousand miles south
      F_William_Finian_McCool@...
  • RE: (Photos: Phoenix lands on Mars)

    WOW!! This is a great happening- now if the water is water as we know it, any lifeforms found will be interesting. It will be somewhere between O. Wells meets 'Total Recall' [and other SciFi greats] meets Al Gore's Global Warming thesis.
    tesh@...
    • Water as we know it?

      I was hoping for Ice 9. :)
      seanferd
  • hopefull

    Cool pattern

    I hope that it finds usable water and maybe some info on the viability of the soil for growing food

    I hate the lack of taste from hydroponically grown food

    And knowing the stupidity of the powers that be we may be eating food from mars here on earth in twenty or so years so they can waste more of our remaining fossil fuels faster
    cwhull
  • RE: (Photos: Phoenix lands on Mars)

    How close-up are these photos? Am I seeing pebbles or large boulders from a distance?
    I'm a novice.
    csotax@...
  • Are you sure this is Mars?

    It looks suspiciously like the Middle East desert outside my tent from back during the 1st Gulf War.

    At least it landed in one-piece this time.

    Hope it doesn't get stomped on by some nasty, alien, autonomous, robotic lifeform.
    Dr_Zinj
  • RE: (Photos: Phoenix lands on Mars)

    OK, I may be confused, but I thought this was the first time we had landed anything on this part of Mars. Yet if you look closely,the third photo has an unusual object in the background. (zdnet.com/gallery/202869-480-480.jpg)

    If you magnify the photo, there appears to be a cylinder shaped, with some type of antenna on top, at the level of the horizon, approx one inch to the right of the center of the photo. What the heck is it? Did ET get there first?
    david602@...
    • Pay no attention to that man in a spacesuit.

      Pay no attention to that man in a spacesuit.
      softwareFlunky
    • cylinder

      pictures are numbered consecutively from 202868 - 202883; number 202871 is missing. Why?
      check it out here: http://content.zdnet.com/2347-9595_22-202866-202871.html?seq=4
      the cylinder is quite obvious. Debris from Phoenix while landing, a parachute container perhaps...
      or a homing beacon? The curvature of the horizon is too much for Earth, compare with the curvature of the skyline while at sea (on Earth).
      Mnighthawk
      • We are not alone...

        pictures 202870, -72, -73, -83 have a snail like 'being' half way to the horizon, left of center. Body to the left and antenna head to the right. Does it wonder if there is intelligent life where that winged monster came from? Is it afraid the huge clawed monster will eat it? We are not alone :-D
        Mnighthawk
  • It's very interesting but ...

    a total waste of money. The stated purpose is to see if there ever were conditions on Mars so that 'life could evolve'. It is a fact that no one has ever produced a realistic scenario of conditions on earth which could have caused life to evolve. Oh they say they do, but when it comes to the details it completely collapses.

    You watch: If the initial answer is 'No' scientists will mumble and postulate and revise until they make it a 'Yes'. Because they are committed to evolution no matter what empirical evidence is found. Why should the US go deeper into bankruptcy to investigate speculation? Might as well fund the Flat Earth Society.
    NatanElias
    • Flat Earth Society

      Looks like the flat earth society has a twin sister called the no evolution society of which Mr. Elias is a card carrying member.
      sturel@...
    • I really don't understand

      Your statement doesn't make sense, even from the strictest creationist point of view.

      There was no eleventh commandment stating, "Thou shalt not explore anything beyond this bubble in which I have placed you."

      Obviously God created all of the planets, solar systems, galaxies, etc. (Or created all the "stuff" that they were created from.) So are you saying that you believe He does not want us to check out His handiwork?

      I understand the fact that the science is not settled, but I don't understand the dead human spirit that locks out all desire to learn more about what's out there.
      Speednet
  • Clouds?

    It may be false color or a camera problem, but doesn't it look like clouds at the top of picture #15?

    http://content.zdnet.com/2346-9595_22-202866-15.html
    Speednet
  • RE: (Photos: Phoenix lands on Mars)

    The mountain labored to waste half a billion dollars and brought forth what we already knew was there. Dirt!
    s.katz@...
  • Yes, Speednet, Mars has clouds, too.

    Mars doesn't have the storm systems we experience here on Earth, but, yes it does get clouds on occasion. If you weren't aware of that fact, then you haven't been doing your homework.
    3dtodd
  • RE: (Photos: Phoenix lands on Mars)

    I just can not imagine the importance of it.

    We are all killing each other here.

    We should be studying our home.

    It is more important than anything else.

    Ray C Spring Hill, Florida
    kush13@...
    • The operative phrase, here, is

      The operative phrase, here, is: "I just can not imagine"

      Sure we're all killing each other, in a whole variety of viciously exploitive ways, here... that's because, barring acts of pure exploration ( "what if"... science, art, and raw discovery ), that's the only other thing that human beings are really good at.

      #1 reason for sending probes to explore the surface of Mars: There are no lawyers up there!

      ...yet.
      douglas442