Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

Summary: The Raspberry Pi is an ultra-low-cost computer system that packs a considerable wallop in an ultra-small form factor. With two models -- $25 and $35, respectively -- they will be extremely affordable solutions. Worldwide availability is expected in November 2011.

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TOPICS: CXO, Hardware
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  • Raspberry Pi is an ultra-low-cost computer that is smaller (but thicker) than a credit card and comes in two models: one priced at $25 and the other at $35. Worldwide availability expect in November 2011.

    Related post: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer that can run Quake 3

    Image credit: The Raspberry Pi Foundation

  • Raspberry Pi is an ultra-low-cost computer that is smaller (but thicker) than a credit card and comes in two models: one priced at $25 and the other at $35. Worldwide availability expect in November 2011.

    Related post: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer that can run Quake 3

    Image credit: The Raspberry Pi Foundation

Topics: CXO, Hardware

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13 comments
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  • all I can say is

    wow...

    Now if they can work out holographic displays, we'd elimate the need for big bulky displays for good!
    kcredden2
  • RE: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

    the technology is not such a surprise in terms of size if you think about what can be crammed into a smartphone these days but the potential price is - bet it wont come with keyboard, mouse and monitor hahah!
    cymru999
    • RE: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

      @cymru999
      Even with a keyboard, mouse and monitor it's under $100.
      jrbeaman
  • Looks pretty sweet.

    Too bad they don't have a decent RTOS on the thing. Wonder if they plan on getting an RTOS BSP going.
    Bruizer
    • RE: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

      @Bruizer

      YES! YES!
      We need a new path to computing besides these huge bloated OS's.
      jrbeaman
  • RE: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

    Of course it's small and cheap.
    That is all it takes if you don't need to run Windows.
    jrbeaman
  • RE: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

    These are what will be in tvs shortly..Needs bluetooth and its perfect pocket computer
    Fletchguy
  • RE: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

    I'll be watching closely the development. I might even buy one. This looks like what the One Laptop PerChild project might benefit from.
    General Ludd
  • The problem is...

    ...that without interface devices and mass storage, it isn't a very useful computer. (The electronics have never been the "bulky" part of a computer.) Still, it's the sort of thing that redefines what's possible and practical.
    GrizzledGeezer
    • RE: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

      @GrizzledGeezer Possibly add a low power ssd? if such a thing exists....
      Rikaroo
    • RE: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

      @GrizzledGeezer It looks like they have a mini/micro/whatever flash reader built in. The $35 version has more ports, including LAN & audio, and they have HDMI support, as well.
      jred
  • RE: Raspberry Pi: A $25 ultra-low-cost computer

    i need a home server , could i be looking into one of these ?
    docesam
  • 700MHz ARM - what's that in Intel MHz?

    Back in 1991 I bought my first desktop PC running an Intel 80486 at 33MHz. I already had an Acorn Archimedes running an ARM at 8MHz. A test run of an Acorn Basic program repeatedly calculating the sine of an angle with thousands of small increments took 1.59 seconds on the '486 and 1.61 seconds on the ARM. On that basis, an ARM MHz is worth about 4 Intel MHz so the 700MHz ARM should be roughly equivalent to a 2.8GHz Intel chip. OK, things have changed a lot since 1991 so the above is stretching logic a bit ;) but the ARM was definitely the right choice of processor - it doesn't need a fan to keep it cool for a start! I shall be buying a Raspberry Pi when they're available as they seem to be a fun device; I might even buy several!
    JohnOfStony