Silica -- a wireless hacking tool

Silica -- a wireless hacking tool

Summary: Penetration testing firm Immunity has started shipping Silica, a wireless handheld pen-testing device capable of finding -- and exploiting -- security vulnerabilities.

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TOPICS: Security
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  • Penetration testing firm Immunity has started shipping Silica, a wireless handheld pen-testing device capable of finding -- and exploiting -- security vulnerabilities.

    The palm-sized PDA tucked away in Justine Aitel's pocketbook just might be the most scary device on display at this year's RSA security conference. [See Ryan Naraine's report.] Aitel is roaming the hallways here with Silica, a portable hacking device that can search for and join 802.11 (Wi-Fi) access points, scan other connections for open ports, and automatically launch code execution exploits from a built-in exploit platform.



    Silica is the brainchild of Aitel's Immunity Inc., a 10-employee penetration testing outfit operating out of Miami Beach, Florida. It runs a customized version of CANVAS, the company's flagship point-and-click attack tool that features hundreds of exploits, an automated exploitation system, and an exploit development framework.
  • Silica now runs on the Nokia 770 but Immunity plans to expand the range of supported devices.

Topic: Security

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19 comments
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  • Silica

    That's it. I'm changing careers and becoming a potato farmer. Give one more thing to hackers so they can attack mindless home users who think their computers are secured on the new Vista!
    unhappyuser
    • robertroot

      Amen, brother!
      uppy
    • I'll just make my mead...

      ...And be at peace with the world!
      Vista is more like 'Hasta La Vista, baby!' for me when it comes to Windows.
      This has to be one of the worst OSes in history, or herstory for that matter.
      I'm gonna recommend people buy Macs from now on.
      Roc5955
      • The FUD abounds

        How could Vista be the worst OS in history when XP was the worst...well actually it might have been Windows Me....well wait a sec...as I recall by time XP came around most people were saying it was Win 98 that was the worst...well...of course if WIndows 95 was being used still it would never hold up security wise so....

        Nope. I guess your wrong. Looks like Vista may actually be the best. Dont know how you missed that. Of course I guess you dont care much for Windows in general do you.
        Cayble
  • Sweet!

    This is a GOOD thing! Don't you GET IT??!
    dantheman123
    • So is the clap

      Did you get it?
      No_Ax_to_Grind
    • Re to Dantheman123

      You said, "Sweet!
      This is a GOOD thing! Don't you GET IT??!"

      My response:
      No.
      LegendsOfBatman
  • Who said UMPCs are worthless?

    Guess some folks may be singing a different tune now, eh?
    Confused by religion
  • So, where's the source code?

    Runs on a customized version of Debian/Linux? Sounds GNU to me, so the sources should be available...
    JDThompson
    • no

      If the application runs in userpsace and you don't include other GPL code, you don't need to provide sources.
      patibulo
    • Good point. (source code)

      This should be under the GPL right?
      jayeola
  • DID I READ THIS CORRECTLY?

    This device is designed to attack a network transmission with a code execution exploit?This device can perform a "Clean Stop" of a network transmission?This is a "Penetration Testing" device?What do I do if this device shuts down my network?
    anonymous
    • MY GUESS WOULD BE

      Fix the holes in your network that allowed that to happen?

      Just a thought.
      John Zern
    • Wakeup call for idiots...

      Therefore, I want one... I see some good uses for this thing... Like a friend who doesn't care for security...
      kamahl928
    • Sue

      Just a thought.
      Too Old For IT
  • People who care aren't affected

    People who don't care about security don't do things online that are risky if observed. People with open Wi-Fi ports know they can close them if they want to but don't bother. It doesn't take much imagination to realize the RIAA could be calling you if someone were using your WiFi to share music... but they don't worry about it. IF you have the need you cover yourself. IF you get surprised then you're stupid only if you get taken down twice.
    qaz111111qaz111111
    • Re to qaz111111qaz111111

      We're at the point where our security programs are letting people gain control over our systems. If the anti virus programmers are unable to secure things, how the heck are the rest of us?
      It only takes them once to screw us up. We have so many things to watch for, about the only thing we can do is sit back and watch them destroy us.
      LegendsOfBatman
  • Zaurus

    Seems like it pulls together a lot of things I've had on a Sharp Zaurus SL-5500 for years. Maybe someone can re-package some comparable tools making them more unified so I can add them in the package manager...seems a lot cheaper. Unless it comes with everything shown in the picture. ;-)
    paroberts
  • RE: Making progress (Silica -- a wireless hacking tool )

    Scary hacking tool? That looks like one of those crappy old Nokia tablets, a N770 or something.
    408jay