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Intel PRO/Wireless 5000 Access Point

Intel PRO/Wireless 5000 Access Point

If you're interested in the latest, fastest wireless networking systems, read on. Intel's PRO/Wireless 5000 Access Point uses the 802.11a standard, aimed at providing high-speed cable-free network connections. Intel is the first vendor to submit 802.11a equipment to us for review, although other manufacturers are due to release products soon. The 802.11a standard uses the 5GHz radio band -- called the UNII spectrum in the US -- and has a raw data rate of 54Mbps. This is almost a five-times improvement over 802.11b wireless networking, in theory at least.

September 26, 2002 by in Reviews

CorelDRAW Graphics Suite 11

CorelDRAW Graphics Suite 11

Looking to establish a digital-graphics studio? Consider an all-in-one graphics solution. CorelDRAW Graphics Suite 11 has applications for professional-level illustration, image editing and Web graphics. CorelDRAW 11 serves as the main course of Graphics Suite 11, but the side dishes are certainly worth a look. Photo-Paint (image editing) and RAVE (Web graphics animation) pack enough features to satisfy most home users who want to edit digital photos or create simple flash animation. Best of all, you get these applications for just £377 (ex. VAT; £443 inc. VAT) -- a great bargain for an all-around, well-integrated solution. However, for top-of-the-line image editing and animation, professional graphic designers should shell out the extra cash for Photoshop and LiveMotion.

September 25, 2002 by in Developer

Dell Inspiron 8200 (2.2GHz Mobile P4)

Dell Inspiron 8200 (2.2GHz Mobile P4)

Dell's Inspiron 8200 range of desktop replacement notebooks is regularly the first to showcase a new flagship Intel mobile processor, and the latest 2.2GHz Mobile Pentium 4-based model is no exception. Another first with this particular Inspiron 8200 is its leading-edge graphics accelerator -- ATI's Mobility Radeon 9000. Previous high-end Inspiron 8200s have used nVidia's GeForce4 440 Go chip, to good effect. However, the Mobility Radeon 9000 takes notebook 3D graphics performance to another level. If you're looking for a no-holds-barred notebook performer, and you don't mind its considerable bulk and 3.74kg weight, look no further than this Inspiron 8200 model.

September 24, 2002 by in Laptops

Handspring Treo 90

Handspring Treo 90

Handspring's Treo 90 may lack the cellphone and wireless-data features of the more expensive models in the line, but its thumb keyboard provides a unique alternative for those looking for an affordable colour Palm OS handheld. Some of the Handspring faithful may cry ‘foul’ when they learn that there's no Springboard expansion slot. But if you don't like Graffiti, the slim Treo 90 is a great choice.

September 24, 2002 by in Mobility

ACT! 6.0

ACT! 6.0

ACT! 6.0 doesn't look much different from ACT! 2000, but underneath you'll find lots of new customer relationship management (CRM) features. Its increased Outlook integration and Outlook-like email client eliminate double entries or repetitive cutting and pasting for Outlook users. ACT! 6.0's beefed-up scheduling skills also make tracking tasks simpler than ever. Unfortunately, it still lacks the more sophisticated sales tools and e-commerce connections offered by competitors like GoldMine and Maximizer. But if your contact management tasks have outgrown Outlook and you want to ease into CRM, we recommend ACT! 6.0.

September 23, 2002 by in Developer

Dell TrueMobile GPRS Solution

Dell TrueMobile GPRS Solution

Wireless technology has now permeated the computing landscape at all spatial scales: Bluetooth for local cable replacement within 10 metres or so; 802.11b for LAN and Internet access up to 30m from an access point or gateway; and GPRS for remote access to corporate networks and the Internet wherever you can get a signal. Data rates range from up to 56Kbps for GPRS to a maximum of 11Mbps for 802.11b, with Bluetooth slotting in at just under 1Mbps. Companies with flexible, mobile workforces will be interested in all of these technologies, but GPRS, with the potential to wirelessly connect remote workers pretty much continuously, is likely to top the list.

September 20, 2002 by in Hardware

HP Photosmart 130

HP Photosmart 130

Unlike many photo printers, which are basically conventional inkjets with improved photo-printing skills, HP’s diminutive Photosmart 130 prints only 10 by 15cm photos. For digital camera enthusiasts, this is hardly a shortcoming: the £106.37 (ex. VAT; £124.99 ex. VAT) toaster-sized 130 does one thing, and does it well -- printing gorgeous photographs with minimum fuss. You don't even need to hook up the Photosmart 130 to your PC: this printer works straight from your digital camera. If you want larger prints, however, look to a more conventional product.

September 19, 2002 by in Printers

Asus MyPal A600

Asus MyPal A600

Asus is not a name you immediately associate with Microsoft’s Pocket PC platform, but that may change with the launch of the MyPal A600 in Europe. According to Asus, the MyPal A600 is the world’s smallest, lightest, thinnest and most powerful handheld. So much for manufacturers’ claims: what really matters is how the £387 (inc. VAT; £329 ex. VAT) MyPal A600 stands up against its immediate competition in terms of functionality and usability. Here's what we found in a preview of a pre-production device.

September 17, 2002 by in Mobility

Philips DVDRW228

Philips DVDRW228

The DVDRW228 is Philips's second-generation DVD+RW drive. Like its predecessor, it reads and writes CD-R, CD-RW and DVD+RW media. However, the new model also adds support for DVD+R write-once discs so that you can prevent important data from being overwritten. Philips rounds out the package with a multimedia-rich software bundle, making the DVDRW228 a must-have for digital video enthusiasts.

September 13, 2002 by in Storage

Pinnacle Studio 8.0

Pinnacle Studio 8.0

It's been well over a year since Pinnacle Systems Studio DV took top honours in our roundup of low-cost video editing solutions. Now, Pinnacle looks to dominate once again with Studio 8, the company's newest editing program that includes DVD authoring, new 3D transitions and a host of useful, well-integrated editing tools for both the novice and intermediate video editor.

September 12, 2002 by in Developer

Epson Stylus Photo 2100

Epson Stylus Photo 2100

The phrase ‘light black’ might seem like an oxymoron, but in the case of the Epson Stylus Photo 2100, it makes perfect sense. This printer’s enhanced seven-colour UltraChrome pigment-ink set and increased maximum resolution of 2,880 by 1,440 dote per inch (dpi) combine to deliver some of the best archival-quality inkjet output we've ever seen. Although it’s very expensive, the Stylus Photo 2100 is well worth the price for photography professionals who demand high-quality prints that will last.

September 10, 2002 by in Printers

Norton AntiVirus 2003

Norton AntiVirus 2003

There's a lot to love in Norton AntiVirus 2003. Its interface is simple enough for beginners yet offers plenty of flexibility for discerning geeks. It scans and cleans attachments from popular instant messengers -- a first for Norton AntiVirus (NAV) -- and automatically repairs infected files without troubling you. Plus, its script- and worm-blocking technologies stop email viruses, including SirCam and Klez. If you use the Internet on a Windows machine and are looking for your first anti-virus program, this £34.03 (ex. VAT; £39.99 inc. VAT) package will serve you well. Current NAV users should stick with NAV 2002, however -- version 2003 doesn't justify the £21.27 (ex. VAT; £24.99 ex. VAT) upgrade price.

September 9, 2002 by in Security

Microtek ScanMaker 4800

Microtek ScanMaker 4800

Microtek’s low-cost ScanMaker 4800 promises a big return on a small investment. It features 48-bit colour, a 2,400 by 1,200 dots per inch (dpi) maximum resolution, and a film/slide attachment. But our tests revealed that although some of the ScanMaker 4800's features are exceptional, others are just for show.

September 5, 2002 by in Hardware

BTopenworld / Linksys Instant Wireless Network Access Point

BTopenworld / Linksys Instant Wireless Network Access Point

Given BTopenworld's involvement in DSL broadband, you might be forgiven for assuming that its first branded product would be a home gateway. Not so: this is straightforward 802.11b wireless networking kit. You might also think, bearing in mind the number of home users who will be interested in this product, that it would be easy to install and use. If so, you'll be disappointed.

September 3, 2002 by in Reviews

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