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IBM ThinkPad X30

IBM ThinkPad X30

Even seasoned manufacturers can drop a clanger when it comes to designing an ultraportable notebook, so it’s worth taking notice of a good one. A really good one -- and IBM’s ThinkPad X30 is a really good one -- might even be worth paying a premium for. This is fortunate for IBM, since, even with a recent price drop, the X30 isn't exactly cheap.

November 12, 2002 by in Laptops

Fujitsu Siemens Stylistic ST4110

Fujitsu Siemens Stylistic ST4110

Fujitsu-Siemens' contribution to the Tablet PC market is slim, well-proportioned and business-like. Performance is uninspiring, but the battery life is the better of the two tablets we've seen. Couple this unit with its docking station and you're getting Tablet PC functionality without sacrificing too much of what you'd expect from a desktop or notebook.

November 11, 2002 by in Mobility

Sage Line 50 v9 Financial Controller

Sage Line 50 v9 Financial Controller

Line 50 v9 is the latest accounting ‘solution’ from Sage, probably the UK’s best-known publisher of business accounting software. The Sage range, split into five product groups, covers practically every business situation, from Instant Accounting for the one-man band to the Web-enabled Line 500 for large-scale industries. Within those groups, there are different levels of functionality dependent on the extent of your requirements and the depth of your pocket.

November 11, 2002 by in Developer

Toshiba Portégé 3500

Toshiba Portégé 3500

Toshiba’s Portégé 3500 must be one of the most keenly awaited of the various Tablet PCs launched on 7 November in conjunction with Microsoft’s Windows XP Tablet PC Edition. And quite right too. When Microsoft launches a modified version of Windows supporting handwriting recognition, and Toshiba designs a specially customised portable to run it, the results ought to be interesting.

November 11, 2002 by in Mobility

Windows XP Tablet PC Edition

Windows XP Tablet PC Edition

An all-new PC form factor such as the tablet PC needs an all-new operating system, too -- an OS that can make new hardware features easy to use and quick to learn. Enter Windows XP Tablet PC Edition. This OS, which now comes preinstalled on all or most new tablets, is a modified version of Windows XP Professional, with a few extras. It includes new utilities -- namely, Journal, Sticky Notes and Ink -- that let you handwrite notes anywhere, as well as support for a variety of applications written specifically for tablets. Although Microsoft's new OS is perfectly suited for tablet PCs, we're not sure the tablet PC itself is perfectly suited to everyday use. If you're willing to take on a learning curve, though, Microsoft's new OS is the application that makes the tablet usable.

November 7, 2002 by in Enterprise Software

ViewSonic Tablet PC V1100

ViewSonic Tablet PC V1100

ViewSonic is better known as a monitor manufacturer, but has been making tablet-style PCs for some time. The Tablet PC V1100 is a new model designed to run Windows XP Tablet PC Edition. It has a standard feature set and performance in line with its specification, but weight and battery life prevent it from being a truly mobile solution.

November 7, 2002 by in Mobility

Gyration Ultra Cordless Optical Mouse & Mobile Keyboard

Gyration Ultra Cordless Optical Mouse & Mobile Keyboard

Inventors won't leave pointing devices alone. Just because the computer mouse is one of the simplest input devices that worked perfectly well the day it was born doesn't mean you can't reinvent it endlessly. One of the latest variants comes from Gyration, whose Ultra Cordless Optical Mouse looks at first like many others: a radio link replaces the cable, it uses rechargeable batteries, and optical sensors detect motion across a flat surface. The difference comes when you lift it up: it carries on working. Wave your hand around as much as you like, and the on-screen pointer will carry on tracking your hand movements.

November 6, 2002 by in Hardware

LindowsOS 2.0

LindowsOS 2.0

Lindows 2.0 is like Baby Bear's porridge -- it's just right. This new operating system isn't too hardcore for the average user, and it's nowhere near as expensive to buy and operate as Windows (the download costs just $99, while the full CD version is priced at $129). Plus, it's easy to use, sports an attractive interface and comes with an application subscription package that can't be beaten. Perhaps future versions will offer improved stability and better technical support: in the meantime, if you're looking for the full-on Linux experience, stick to Red Hat 8 or Mandrake 9. But if you want something in between -- not too technical, not too easy and not too mainstream -- don't be afraid to try Lindows.

November 5, 2002 by in Enterprise Software

Epson Perfection 2450 Photo

Epson Perfection 2450 Photo

Epson's Perfection 2450 photo scanner is a consumer-oriented device that graphics professionals and advanced photographers won't hesitate to use. With fast one-touch scanning, great image quality and software that even novices will master in minutes, this 48-bit image grabber is a home or business user's dream. The Perfection 2450 photo scanner's price is justified by features that imaging professionals will love, too, including 2,400 by 4,800 dots per inch (dpi) resolution, a built-in transparency unit and an advanced image-capture driver with a multitude of fine-tuning controls.

November 5, 2002 by in Hardware

Logitech Cordless MouseMan Optical

Logitech Cordless MouseMan Optical

Until recently you had two options for upgrading your mouse. You could ditch the roller ball in favour of an optical mouse, or you could cut the cord and go with a cordless mouse. With Logitech’s Cordless MouseMan Optical, you can have the freedom of a cordless mouse along with the precision of an optical mouse. It truly is a beautiful marriage.

November 1, 2002 in Hardware

Sony VPL-CX5

Sony VPL-CX5

Sony has put its usual sleek, stylish spin on a product and come up with the VPL-CX5 projector. Slimline, lightweight and bright, it also includes a Memory Stick slot, allowing you to give presentations without a notebook. Although the styling and some of Sony's publicity may suggest that this is a home cinema projector, its feature set makes it far more suitable for presentation work.

October 31, 2002 by in Hardware

Orange SPV

Orange SPV

If a phone is something you pull out of its packaging, charge up, and then start dialling numbers with, then the SPV from Orange -- the first Smartphone 2002 (formerly codenamed 'Stinger') device on the market -- isn't a phone. Instead of a 'phone book' and a simple SMS tool, it has Pocket Outlook. You can also browse full-colour Web pages with Pocket Internet Explorer. But you won't just plug it in and use these features – indeed, many people will never use these features. This is a shame, because once you have the SPV (it stands for Sound, Pictures, Video) set up, it really is rather neat.

October 30, 2002 by in Mobility

Palm Tungsten T

Palm Tungsten T

The Tungsten T is Palm's first device to run Palm OS 5.0. It's also the company's first model to feature a convertible design, built-in Bluetooth, and stereo sound. Like Palm's earlier high-end units, the Palm V and the Palm m515, the Tungsten is a sleek, elegantly designed handheld that's a bit of a status symbol. This attractive device performs well, too, but it's not quite as polished as it should be, considering its price tag.

October 29, 2002 by in Mobility

Premiere 6.5

Premiere 6.5

For years now, Adobe’s Premiere has been the chosen non-linear editing (NLE) application of choice for video professionals and enthusiasts alike. However, it has recently been showing signs of age. The question is, has the launch of Premiere 6.5 addressed the shortfalls of version 6? Or will we still be waiting for the elusive version 7 to be released?

October 28, 2002 by in Developer

Asus SpaceLink WL-300 Access Point

Asus SpaceLink WL-300 Access Point

The SpaceLink WL-300 from Asus is a compact 802.11b access point offering no-frills, low-cost wireless networking. Its throughput isn't outstanding, and there are some quirks to the management software, but if you're on a tight budget but would like to try wireless networking, this is probably the cheapest way of doing it.

October 25, 2002 by in Reviews

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