Raspberry Pi: Fun with a serious purpose

Raspberry Pi: Fun with a serious purpose

Summary: I had almost forgotten how much fun personal computing could be; and that's the point of this miniature device.

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TOPICS: Hardware, Linux
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As I was reconnecting the Raspberry Pi to our TV set yesterday evening (it bounces back and forth between connection on my desk and to the TV), I realised that I haven't had this much plain old fun with computing in a very long time. 

I suppose that I should thank the openELEC developers for not supporting my ridiculously long 63-character WiFi password; if I didn't have to move the Pi back to my desk from time to time in order to connect the wired network, I would probably never get my hands on it.

The fun comes from being able to connect different things to it, try different things on it (both software and hardware), and just generally get my hands dirty with it. 

Looking at the different programming languages and developement environments on it, for example, trying different kinds of USB devices, wireless connections (wi-fi and Bluetooth), and the camera, of course. Next up will be the expansion bus - it's been more than 30 years since I got an Electrical Engineering degree, and I have never really worked in that field, but I'm still fascinated by hardware, and the Pi is a perfect way to be able to investigate, experiement, learn, and just have fun with it.

Of course, I have shown the Raspberry Pi to all sorts of people who have been around to visit. Their reactions have been interesting - those for whom computers are just a "tool" don't show much interest or appreciation, and when they see what the performance is like with Raspbian running, they generally just shrug and walk away, probably wondering what a weird person I am (many probably wonder that anyway.).

Those who have more of a computer/electronic background or interests always react pretty much the same way - "Wow! Way cool!", often before I even boot it up.

But the most interesting and inspiring reactions have come from the kids I have shown it to. Many of them have not only been wowed by it but immediately asked what could be done with it.

The first thing they always want to do is take apart the box, so they can see what's inside, how it connects, what the bits and pieces are. This is the kind of interest, and excitement, which can change some kinds from passive consumers of mind-numbing 'social' media to active participants, explorers and developers.

Of course, another excellent example of this effect is the Raspberry Pi Web Site. If you haven't looked at their home page yet, you really should. 

Heck, I'll go even further than that, I'll say that if you are even mildly interested in this kind of activity, you should be checking back on that page regularly. 

It never ceases to amuse and amaze me with the variety and quality of projects, information, documentation, and just plain fun that they post there. From canine mind reading (No More Woof) to environmentally activated high-resolution advertising boards, with loads of books, tutorials and full-blown classroom examples, this is a web site where the fun - and the education - really never stops.

Ok, enough of the soap-box evangelizing for today.  The bottom line here is, not only do I get great pleasure from my Raspberry Pi, it is going to make Christmas shopping for some of my best friends (and their parents) a lot easier.  Try it.  I'm sure you'll like it.

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Topics: Hardware, Linux

J.A. Watson

About J.A. Watson

I started working with what we called "analog computers" in aircraft maintenance with the United States Air Force in 1970. After finishing military service and returning to university, I was introduced to microprocessors and machine language programming on Intel 4040 processors. After that I also worked on, operated and programmed Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-8, PDP-11 (/45 and /70) and VAX minicomputers. I was involved with the first wave of Unix-based microcomputers, in the early '80s. I have been working in software development, operation, installation and support since then.

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  • FUN WITH RASPBERRY PI

    Hi J.A.W. - I just wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed your well-written article on having fun with Raspberry Pi: I had as much fun just reading it! Thank you!

    Being 77 technology caught me unawares, and only after retirement from a judicial/administration environment did I venture into Tech, and I have really enjoyed learning, starting with the 286, 386 (did I get these references right?), Windows 98SE, XP Home SP3 and now Windows 7 Professional, both 32 and 64 bit. Now I can talk along with the youngsters, even helping my older friends with their PC problems!

    But Raspberry Pi is a bit much beyond me, I think, but I enjoyed your enthusiastic article!
    Bobby Bowen
    • Thanks

      Hi Bobby, Thanks very much for taking the time to comment. I hope that my blog continues to provide information, inspiration and entertainment, because I have all of those in mind when I write it.

      Thanks for reading and commenting.

      jw
      j.a.watson@...