Samba 4.1 brings Linux desktop and Mac files from Windows 8, Server 2012

Samba 4.1 brings Linux desktop and Mac files from Windows 8, Server 2012

Summary: Samba, which has been bringing Windows-compatible file sharing to Linux servers, Mac servers, and desktops for years, takes another step forward.

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The big file-sharing leap came with Samba 4. That release brought Linux an Active Directory (AD) domain controller. With that version, Samba gained the ability to share files with both old and new Windows systems by bringing its support up to Server Message Block (SMB) 3. Now, with a smaller file-sharing jump, Samba 4.1 brings Linux desktops and Macs the power to use files being offered by Windows 8.x and Windows 2012 servers using SMB 3.

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Samba 4.1 brings the power to use files on Windows 8 and Server 2012 to Linux and Mac desktops.

To be exact, "Samba 4.1.0 contains the first release of our client tools and client library that work over the new protocols SMB2 or SMB3."  That said, "The default protocol for smbclient and smbcacls is still SMB1 (the NT1 protocol dialect).  If you want to use the newer versions of SMB you'll need to set them up manually by adding the -mMAX_PROTOCOL command line switch to either smbclient or smbcacls."

An easier way to do this will be to use the "client max protocol" parameter in the [global] section of your Linux desktop's or Mac's smb.conf file. For example, by placing

client max protocol = SMB3

in the smb.conf file these desktops will automatically try the SMB3 protocol when connecting to Windows 8, Windows 2012, or Samba 4.x server. Eventually this will also enable Macs, which can also use Samba, to connect to these file servers as well.

While this nuts and bolts approach won't appeal to anyone except system administrators, GUI-based file sharing tools will hide these technical details away as Samba 4.1 is integrated into desktops.

One tool you won't be able to use on Linux to set up your desktop to use SMB3 is the venerable Samba Web Administration Tool (SWAT). SWAT has been swatted not because the tool isn't useful, but it's proven beyond the Samba project's resources to properly secure it. So, rather than expose file sharing to possible attacks via SWAT, the program been placed into retirement.

Jeremy Allison, a senior Samba developer and Google's Linux evangelist added that, "With the latest Snowdon revelations it's nice to note we now support SMB3 transport level encryption to Windows 2012 servers as well as Samba4 servers. We've had Samba -> Samba transport encryption over SMB1 for many years already, of course, having it [transport encryption] to Windows servers is the new thing." This means that Linux systems sharing files from Server 2012 will be far less prone to having the file's data snatched in mid-stream.

"Although," Allison wryly noted, "With the design of that protocol coming from a US-based company it's hard to know if it's completely trustworthy."

In addition this new Samba brings improved directory database replication and server-side copy. Finally, Samba brings better Linux btrfs support, and, as Allison noted, "A boatload of fixes and stabilization as we push towards full SMB3 support!"

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Topics: Enterprise Software, Apple, Linux, Open Source, Servers, Windows, Windows 8

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7 comments
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  • What are your comments regarding this?

    "Jeremy Allison, a senior Samba developer and Google's Linux evangelist added that, "With the latest Snowdon revelations it's nice to note we now support SMB3 transport level encryption to Windows 2012 servers as well as Samba4 servers. "

    www.freeyourselffrommicrosoftandthensa.org
    IndianArt
    • Sounds like an advertisement.

      Shoo little paranoid advertisement person, shoo.

      ZD|Net's got something against links, so...
      ForeverCookie
      • Not an Ad, the PDF version of this book is free

        http://www.freeyourselffrommicrosoftandthensa.org/free-pdf?download=28:free-yourself-from-microsoft-and-the-nsa-complete-book-16-mb
        IndianArt
        • The paranoid always amaze me

          The paranoid always amaze me. They really believe that the NSA would be interested in their daily e-mails. This belief takes them to the brink of paralysis, making them completely unable to function without screaming that they've been violated.

          Considering the paranoid claims that UEFI is a Windows kill switch enabled by the NSA, and that UEFI was invented by Intel and exists on both Windows and Linux based computers, one must wonder how intelligible this little pamphlet might be. In my mind, not worth the time to read.

          By the way, if you believe that the NSA can't successfully attack Linux, I think you vastly underestimate their abilities. . . . . . . . .
          Cynical99
  • *snicker*

    "'Although,' Allison wryly noted, 'With the design of that protocol coming from a US-based company it's hard to know if it's completely trustworthy.'" Nothing like looking at American software engineering through a PRISM.
    Champ_Kind
  • One......

    I guess this is something to be glad about, but I'm seeing that soon all software will become "one" in that you will buy a Microsft device, and it will have bits & pieces of Open Source software on it. As for the NSA and this incessant chatter about rights that have been violated, well I think if you have something to hide, then of COURSE you should be upset, but if the government wants to read my boring @$$ e-mails about what version of CEntOS needs to be installed in order to get an older version of Apache successfully installed, then by all means they are welcome to....granted I may have some personal emails to or from my girlfriend...but even that's not a problem....I just wish people would get over it. As was stated earlier, do you think they're unable to "get to you" via various means? I seriously doubt it. From the calls you make on your cellphone...to your banking activity.....(and that always amazes me...that these people who complain STILL use "online" banking//or make purcahses with the Visa cards online..!!)....they already know it......LOL!
    Knighthawk5193
    • It still doesn't make it right

      I suppose it depends on how you define the 4th amendment. I do think it is unreasonable that the government can do this to peoples information. Because it is widespread and I suppose somewhat 'normal' still doesn't make it right.
      Whether I have something to hide or not really doesn't matter to me. But that is me. I suppose a 'terrorist' would agree me with me, right? But we are all 'terrorists' in the eyes of the government. The Patriot Act made sure of that.
      So yeah, I have nothing to hide. I can run with that.
      Now give me your Social Security number, facebook account information and while we are at it give me your banking information. I mean, you have nothing to hide, right?
      bigpook