SAP asks if NBN really should come first

SAP asks if NBN really should come first

Summary: The managing director of the Australian branch of global software giant SAP has declared the Federal Government's flagship National Broadband Network project a "wasted investment" because it doesn't focus on wireless technology.

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TOPICS: Broadband, SAP, NBN
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The managing director of the Australian branch of global software giant SAP has declared the Federal Government's flagship National Broadband Network project a "wasted investment" because it doesn't focus on wireless technology.

Global companies such as IBM and Google have backed the predominantly fibre-based NBN as a crucial enabler driving productivity gains around the nation, with Google chairman Eric Schmidt going so far as to state at a conference in Spain several weeks ago that the project meant Australia was "leading the world" in understanding the importance of fibre.

However, in a speech on Tuesday to a lunch held by the American Chamber of Commerce in Australia, first outed by the Australian Financial Review, SAP Australia managing director Tim Ebbeck wasn't as keen on the initiative.

Ebbeck noted that while he was "a great supporter of improved ubiquitous broadband for Australia", the final mix of wired and wireless technologies used in the roll out "must be tweaked", and the total cost of the project must come down, which was fuelled by the use of wireless instead of fibre.

"A National Broadband Network that is not delivering mobility as its principal connection approach is, in my view, wasted investment and opportunity," Ebbeck said, according to a copy of the speech distributed by SAP yesterday.

The NBN will use wireless and satellite to service a small portion of Australia's population, but the overwhelming majority will use fibre. Most technology experts, including those from the major mobile telcos themselves, have agreed over the past few months that Australia will need both wireless and fixed broadband in future to be able to fuel its information and communications needs.

The SAP chief said, according to government agency Infrastructure Australia, that there was currently a "priority pipeline" of $82.8 billion worth of projects to improve Australian infrastructure which needed funding. This did include broadband, but also a national freight network, adaptable and secure water supplies and a national energy market.

"Frankly, I am tired of all the discussion being focused on the broadband network," said Ebbeck. "It is not the most important of these infrastructure requirements, as supportive as I am of ubiquitous broadband with a strong wireless focus. I contend that water and transport infrastructure are the top priorities out of the list of seven."

Ebbeck highlighted increased corporate adoption of the Apple iPad — which the German company is rolling out to its staff globally — as well as other enterprise mobility solutions as evidence of how technology could enhance productivity in Australia's economy.

Other themes of the executive's speech included the need to better capture benefits from the mining boom — which Ebbeck said had masked poor performance in the rest of the economy over the past decade — as well as the need to populate the country with skilled workers to sustain growth, and for organisations to welcome technology-fuelled innovation to increase national productivity.

Topics: Broadband, SAP, NBN

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24 comments
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  • This Say's it all:

    "Frankly, I am tired of all the discussion being focused on the broadband network,"

    In Fact, $82.8 billion should read $100 plus if NBN hits $50 billion
    Vasso Massonic
  • "Ooh BTW - how are those TLS shares going? You may recall a week or so ago when they were $2.80+, I mentioned when Telstra fall as they have, I will again buy in...

    How hypocritical is that RS. You bag Telstra shareholders at the absolute drop of a hat for being greedy, yet consistently reckon you buy in, whenever the opportunity arises. (Which I doubt really !) Anyway, at the end of the day, I think Ebbeck has a far better understanding of the NBN overall, than you do.
    Wallingford-314a6
  • I don't agree that NBN is a "wasted investment and opportunity". Wireless networks can't exist in isolation of a broadband work, afterall how does a wireless network connect to the rest of the internet? What is really being implied by all this wireless versus fibre talk is there also needs to be a National Wireless Network initiative as well. The idea of improving wireless coverage and throughput by the deployment of lots and lots of short range wireless transceivers makes sense. But you still need the NBN to connect all those wireless transceivers!
    chris.velevitch@...
    • chris610,

      I agree. It' not a wasted investment opportunity, if we can afford the luxury in the current precarious economic climate brought about by the expensive remedial measures we are all aware of.

      The scorched earth policy adopted by the government to dismantle what we have built over centuries and replacing it by a force fed FTTH over the next decade is lunacy to say the least.

      The world fastest wireless network - Next G was rapidly deployed by Telstra using its existing terrestrial infrastructure both networks appear to satisfy the needs of run of the mill companies, as evidenced by the SAP commentary VIZ: ....... ( http://www.zdnet.com.au/sap-asks-if-nbn-really-should-come-first-339311155.htm )

      What is really needed is filling the gaps at a seasonable CapEx outlay.
      Vasso Massonic
      • Sorry mate, I quoted the wrong comentary it's Salmat not SAP!

        http://www.zdnet.com.au/nbn-good-but-dsl-works-fine-salmat-339311089.htm
        Vasso Massonic
      • Once again I ask (unanswered many times already) Mr. Massonic, how does your latest comment fit in with this previous comment of yours from ET...

        "...I still firmly believe the NBN is the best thing for Telstra and Shareholders in the long run.. To do anything else is sheer folly”…

        Seems contradicting one's self is a trait common to both the NBN FUDster and TLS puppet...! As you now clearly promote folly (your words, not mine...)!

        I look forward to you AGAIN not answering and saying something like I will no longer correspond with you (ha), Illegitimi non carborundum, ignoramus or something equally intelligently [sic] evasive.
        RS-ef540
        • For Telstra and Shareholders in the long run..

          Yes. After all, we receive, after tax, compensation of $11 billion

          "...I still firmly believe the NBN is the best thing for Telstra and Shareholders in the long run.. To do anything else is sheer folly”…

          For Our National Interest, in the light of the current precarious economic climate brought about by the expensive remedial measures we are all aware of.

          A NO, NO.

          "The scorched earth policy adopted by the government to dismantle what we have built over centuries and replacing it by a force fed FTTH over the next decade is lunacy to say the least. "

          I do not respond simply because your comprehension is 0/10, God only knows what you will come up with now that I have?
          Vasso Massonic
          • Well Vasso, you asked for it, and immediately got back exactly what you surely must have expected............the same, never ending hypocritical RS nonsense........................Nothing ever changes in that regard !!!
            Wallingford-314a6
  • Oh how silly of me trying to correspond with you rationally...

    Are you for real, you never respond to anybody rationally. And better a Hylobatidae (you must think that is so good) than a subterannean grub. Get a life !!!
    Wallingford-314a6
  • Hypocricy - The act of a person pretending to have a character, set of beliefs or principles etc., that one does not possess. A pretender.

    That description fits you like a glove RS. Why anybody even bothers to answer your absurd rants, is beyond me. I do it just to see how much sillier you can get, and it works every time - ROFL !
    Wallingford-314a6
  • ROFL................................Come in Spinner, and right on queue, from the man with the IQ, the same as my age.
    Wallingford-314a6
  • Funny thing RS, is that the only person on this site "crying about those TLS shares", is you ! Probably because you don't have, and have never had any. Hence your obsession in replying, with such venom and animosity towards anyone that makes even the slightest positive comment regarding Telstra. But if that is what turns you on, then so be it. That is your problem, not ours. ( 1 - 2 - 3 wait for it !!! )
    Wallingford-314a6
  • Oh ffs! Here we go again...
    Wireless and fixed is like aeroplanes and ships, TV and cinemas, restaurants and take away. They both serve the same purpose, but deliver it differently and one doesn't replace the other.

    How many people out there are actually ditching their ADSL2+ for wireless?
    Nimos-92373
    • The arguments against the NBN based on cost or technology are as utterly vacuous as the idea mining companies would go broke, and the Australian economy would collapse if they paid more tax. The people making these claims for reliance on wireless, or say the NBN is too expensive, are either inexpressibly stupid suckers for propaganda, or simply shills trying to sabotage its development for selfish reasons.
      Salami Chujillo
      • Indeed Salami!
        RS-ef540
        • Is Salami your twin ?
          Wallingford-314a6
  • Wireless providers are everywhere, but cheap broadband with decent upload speeds (that can be used by more than two people) is what is needed by SMBs. With the NBN, a severe impediment to small businesses establishing themselves, especially in regional/country areas, is removed.

    SAP would just not understand how the current $1700/month for 20Mbps, symmetrical broadband is an SMB-killer.
    Patanjali
  • Oh really look NBN Co just needs to wait for 6 months or so and Sydney will be underwater by then and we all will need broadband in the bush.
    Blank Look
  • "The world fastest wireless network - Next G" yer right, next G if fine for iphones and remote support, but for 24x7 PC use it's is hopeless , right here on my desk I have a 7Mbps next g router and a 8Mbps ADSL1 service and I can tell you the ADSL service is 5 to 10 times faster then the 7Mb nextG service and our main link is a 20Mbps fibre link and it smokes the ADSL link. next G speeds will never match fixed line speeds in real world use. There are already many areas in outer melbourne where you can't even get connected to nextG during peak hours.
    Hmmmmmm-497b2
  • "The world fastest wireless network - Next G" yer right, next G if fine for iphones and remote support, but for 24x7 PC use it's is hopeless , right here on my desk I have a 7Mbps next g router and a 8Mbps ADSL1 service and I can tell you the ADSL service is 5 to 10 times faster then the 7Mb nextG service and our main link is a 20Mbps fibre link and it smokes the ADSL link. next G speeds will never match fixed line speeds in real world use. There are already many areas in outer melbourne where you can't even get connected to nextG during peak hours.
    Hmmmmmm-497b2