Seagate intros its highest capacity NAS HDD with SMBs in mind

Seagate intros its highest capacity NAS HDD with SMBs in mind

Summary: The storage giant also suggested the NAS HDD could be used within the home being that it can hold up to one million songs or 500 hours of HD video.

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Seagate has introduced what it is touting to be its highest-capacity network-attached storage hard disk drive yet.

Custom built with small to midsize businesses in mind, the NAS HDD sports up to four terabytes of storage and can support up to 20 terabytes of data in a five-bay NAS array.

For businesses, the appliance supports multiple user profiles that can optimize power usage for different workloads in order to limit power consumption while aiming to achieve higher levels of performance.

Seagate also suggested the always-on unit could be used within the home, citing the 4TB option can store more than 819,000 photos, one million songs or nearly 500 hours of high-definition video.

The makers further pushed the home office and/or entertainment strategy by describing the NAS HDD as "near silent" with an acoustics range as low as 19 decibels.

For comparison, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association defines an average whisper or quiet library as loud as approximately 30 decibels.

The storage giant argues that its 4TB option provides over 30 percent more capacity than any similar offerings already available, making it the "highest capacity available on the market."

While a specific price tag wasn't divulged, Seagate promised that it will be priced "competitively" and made available through both its distributing partners as well as commercial channels, including Tiger, Newegg, and Amazon.

Seagate also has at least nine NAS system and application industry partners lined up, including LenovoEMC, Asustor, and D-Link.

Seagate has been busy pushing the boundaries on its portfolio lately. The Cupertino, Calif.-based company recently announced that it had commenced shipping its thinnest hard drive yet, measuring in at 5mm thin.

Image via Seagate

Topics: Storage, Hardware, Enterprise 2.0, SMBs

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14 comments
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  • Can you imagine.....

    ....running a data recovery on this drive?
    .
    Have you got a month to spare?
    .
    fm-usa
    • ha ha

      I did a data recovery on a 1tb
      sdavidson118
      • let me finish

        A tb drive and it took around 12+ hours, so I would imagine this one would take forever...
        sdavidson118
  • Hitachi in Dec

    Not sure what the excitement is about, as Hitachi GST (A Western Digital subsidiary) introduced the first 4Tb SATA drive late last year. And it's a good'un. Certainly better than parent WD's first 4Tb model.

    http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/internal-hard-drives/1296265/hitachi-deskstar-7k4000-4tb
    neil.postlethwaite
  • marketing people can't add or subtract; forget math

    819,000 pictures would take me almost 3 years of continuous snapping at 16 hours a day and 8 hours of sleep...give me a brake. in 2 years I have taken 2700 pictures; so it would take me 630 years to fill this hard drive up; so find something else to market ...
    amasys
    • Photos and video users WILL appreciate this.

      I took over 2700 images with my Nikon D300S on our last vacation which lasted 11 days. And I currently have over 100,000 images on my computer. So I wouldn't mind having a decent 1 or 2 Tb drive as a backup. Do I need 4 Tb? Not yet, but someday....
      rfrysztak@...
    • Not so fast, Cowboy

      You're making a lot of assumptions here, starting with thinking everyone's storage needs are related to your own.

      Some of us have been taking digital photos for years and have also scanned thousands of photos from the film age. Storing in the RAW format and using Photoshop on just a portion of them increases storage requirements many times over what you're imagining.

      Not only that, but many of us archive photos for others (family, etc.) as well and have hours and hours of HD video to add to our inventory. Personally, I have more than 4TB of photos and videos, so my drives are pooled to much more than 4TB. And then there's the need for backup for anything highly valued, so 4TB drives no longer seem so cavernous.

      Just something to consider...
      nwtim
      • " Storing in the RAW format and using Photoshop"

        "Storing in the RAW format and using Photoshop on just a portion of them increases storage requirements many times over"

        Well put! I don't take camera photos but I have scanned various yearbooks (letter-size, average 225+ pages) at 400dpi RGB PNG and then converted those to 300dpi grayscale. A single image with one additional layer can take up 50MB. A two-page image with a few layers can easily hit 250-300MB.

        And, of course, as anyone editing large groups of images knows, you keep several stages of "before and after".
        Rick_R
    • ?

      Don't forget that cameras are getting higher resolution every week, so what would once only consume a few hundred gigabytes now takes terabytes. Imagine, someday soon all cell phones will have 20+ megapixel cameras
      sdavidson118
    • Storage needs change over time

      I'm trying to remember what the hard drive capacity was of my Packard Bell 386SX but I'm drawing a blank. The point is that 4 TB seems like overkill now but that will undoubtedly change in a couple of years.
      MajorlyCool
    • Storage needs change over time

      I'm trying to remember what the hard drive capacity was of my Packard Bell 386SX but I'm drawing a blank. The point is that 4 TB seems like overkill now but that will undoubtedly change in a couple of years.
      MajorlyCool
  • 525,600 minutes.

    So 1 million songs at 3 minutes average will play for 3 million minutes or about 6 years. 9 years if you get 8 hours sleep. Wow.
    joetaxpayer
  • I have a 12TB RAID 5 array

    And it's full.......I stream all my Blu-ray/DVDs, photos, home videos, and music using an XBMC-based device. Wish my 4 disk array had 4TB drives instead of 2TB drives...

    @amasys...so as you can see, not everyone's storage requirements are the same as yours...
    scottz29
  • Jeez i remember only having a 4GB machine. Now 320GB-1TB is the norm.

    I'm a little late on this article, but anyway I just got a 3TB hard drive to use as a backup for my 2TB and that's even full. I didn't think i would fill up the 2TB but i did. Trying to back up that using DVD's is futile.. eventually i might mange to shrink that 2TB to at least 1.5TB because i couldn't imagine getting an 8TB later on down the road: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/HAMR-platters-heat-assisted-CREATEC-areal-density,18126.html

    Let alone filling that up. But with all the dvds i own, all the music and movies it'll be interesting how much memory that would take up. Just now i need a new external and i plan on using my regular 2TB as an external and the 3GB as a backup. My previous external is a 120GB plan on just using that as a quick transfer of files from one pc to another & i can use it when i am out. Got plenty of older little 40-80GB drives too, but these days those are just not enough especially when i use my PCs as media players. I don't do photos much but since i am going Blu-ray 4TB is going to be just like the 80GB drives. I definitely would have gotten a 4TB drive if it were not so expensive per TB so i went with the 3TB since i found it to be the cheapest. For most of my movies, i am still using PC dvd drives but i keep running into problems with that, at least on my older PC anyway so at some point getting all my movies onto hard drives is my goal. Still working on my music as well but kinda hit a snag trying to get my cd ripper program working. Need to find another one maybe...
    spineshank155