Showing results 1 to 16 of 16

Sponsored by Red Hat and Intel

March 1, 2015 by

Throwback to the NASA Nebula project

Back in 2011, network architects at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation began investigating the viability of running the organisation's modelling and simulation applications on cloud infrastructure as an alternative to its purpose-built computing cluster named Discover.

April 1, 2014 by

Microservers: What you need to know

Businesses are experimenting with clusters of high-density, low-power servers known as microservers, which are suited to the growing number of hyperscale workloads found inside modern datacentres. Here's why they matter.

June 3, 2013 by

Next-generation networks: An overview

The new enterprise IT landscape of cloud services, mobility and BYOD, social media usage and big data analytics creates very different types of network traffic to the traditional mix of in-house client-server enterprise workloads. How will networks evolve to keep pace?

June 19, 2012

QNAP TS-1079 Pro: a 10-bay storage appliance

Desktop storage appliances tend to stop at eight bays. The QNAP TS-1079 Pro, however, tucks in two more beneath the usual eight, creating a remarkably compact 10-disk appliance with a raw capacity of up to 30TB.

September 29, 2011 by

Boston Fenway 1580-06

A hugely capable 8-way server, the Fenway 1580-06 isn't for everyone, but for large-scale databases, transaction processing, server consolidation and cloud-based computing applications it's hard to match, with the bonus of GPU processing capabilities if needed.

March 2, 2011

Splitting the server atom

In a market dominated by powerful, but power-hungry, Intel Xeon and AMD Opteron processors, SeaMicro is bucking the trend in using the humble Intel Atom to create highly scalable and remarkably energy-efficient servers.Its first product, the 32-bit SM10000, was launched last year, and now there's a 64-bit version, cramming 256 dual-core N570 Atom processors into a 10U rack unit.

May 8, 2006 by

SGI retains fans down under

Despite its flagging financial fortunes, high-end technology vendor Silicon Graphics (SGI) still hascustomers in Australia prepared to back its products. The company's stock price, which once traded at US$50 a share, dipped below the US$1 mark too many times last year, resulting in an embarassing delisting from the New York Stock Exchange and an admission it was facing bankruptcy.


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