Automation+london+benefits

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VMWare and HP align products to bring greater management and insight to virtualized environments

I was just having breakfast yesterday with two systems architects from Seattle, who said they were exploring virtualization, including both VMWare and Xen hypervisors. The liked the potential benefits but were put off by the complexity of setting the stuff up and maintaining it. Their choices, they said, pretty much boiled down to consulting help or more automation in the software.

June 18, 2008 by

Public Sector Tech Project of the Year

Imagine linking 13 medical laboratories onto a single system, and imagine building automation and robotics capabilities in two of the largest. An overly-ambitious plan? Well, several industry experts thought so. But the National Healthcare Group was convinced the benefits would outweigh the potential risk of putting such a system together.In 2003, the Singapore healthcare provider--also a ZDNet Asia Smart50 company--embarked on a bold initiative to build a Lab Information and Automation System (LIS), integrating all of its 13 laboratories into a common platform. At the same time, the National Healthcare Group (NHG) was keen to introduce automation and robotics in two of its largest labs.

July 5, 2006 by

Romania leads outsourcing charge

Eastern European, Middle-Eastern and Asian nations were in London this week to pitch for outsourcing business. Although it can't match the tax-free incentives of some states, Romania reckons it has other benefits to offer

June 16, 2004 by

U.K. lawmakers push to split BT

Regulatory action may be taken against British Telecommunications in an attempt to increase competition in the United Kingdom's broadband market, according to an influential group of lawmakers. The select committee has urged the Office of Telecommunications--the U.K. telecom regulator known as Oftel--and its forthcoming replacement, the Office of Communications (OFCOM), to consider separating BT's network business from the rest of the company. The network is BT's physical infrastructure--including local exchanges and cables--as opposed to its service-based operations, such as BTopenworld. One of the benefits of this separation, the committee believes, is that it might bring down broadband prices. The committee's advice was delivered in a report published Wednesday; it echoes a widespread belief among BT's competitors, which say broadband prices would likely fall if a third party owned BT's fixed-line network. BT isn't permitted to sell any products at a loss--an attempt to prevent the company undercutting rivals to boost market share. ZDNet U.K.'s Graeme Wearden reported from London. To read the full story visit ZDNet U.K.

May 1, 2002 by

Start-up nabs Oracle VP for CEO

Software start-up Evolve has appointed former Oracle Vice President Linda Zecher as its chief executive and president, Evolve said Tuesday. The company, launched in 1995, sells software that helps service companies, such as system integrators and consulting organizations, track and control their projects and labor costs. Zecher, who started her new post Tuesday, replaces interim-CEO Lin Johnstone, who is leaving the Emeryville, Calif.-based company to return to her home in London after five months with the company. At Oracle, Zecher spent five years running a $1.3 billion division of Oracle that sells business applications to services companies. She has also held management positions at PeopleSoft and Bank of America. Evolve competes in the services automation market with Portera, Niku, Opus 360 and PeopleSoft. --Alorie Gilbert, Special to ZDNet News

March 6, 2002 by

Dell laptops to hold GPRS wireless

LONDON--Dell Computer customers in the United Kingdom will soon have notebooks equipped with wide-area wireless access. From mid-March, U.K. consumers will be able to order laptops with GPRS (Global Packet Radio Service) connections that provide always-on, wide-area wireless access to the company network or the Internet. The key benefits will be the ability to send and receive e-mail, browse the Web, and access corporate databases from almost anywhere in the United Kingdom. Later, as roaming agreements fall into place, the service also will be available in other European countries. --Charles McLellan, ZDUK

February 12, 2002 by

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