Bandwidth+server

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NetCrunch Server

NetCrunch 8 is an all-in-one and agentless network monitoring and management system, capable of monitoring every device in your network....

December 8, 2014 by AdRem Software

Shareholders approve Youku-Tudou merger

The greenlight for the merger will allow both companies to drive down costs in areas such as copyright, bandwidth, and server purchases, but "synergies" will need to be quickly achieved to boost bottomlines.

August 20, 2012 by

1&1 Dynamic Cloud Server

Hosted Windows and Linux servers that let you pay for CPU, RAM and storage by the hour — for small business not just enterprise: is a Dynamic Cloud Server a good way to scale a business web service?Usually, when you pay for a hosted server, you pick the specification you think you need and pay for extra bandwidth if you need it.

April 12, 2012

Google's a DDoS tool: security tester

A security penetration tester at Italian security firm AIR Sicurezza Informatica has claimed that flaws exist in Google's servers that will allow would-be hackers to exploit the search giant's bandwidth and launch a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack on a server of their choosing.

August 29, 2011 by

ManageEngine OpManager

ManageEngine OpManager is a network management platform that helps large enterprises, service providers and SMEs manage their data...

November 27, 2014 by ZOHO

Datacentre disaster lessons

As a system administrator, the health and status of your datacentre is at the forefront of your mind. But how often do you think about the needs beyond server status and bandwidth?

July 5, 2009 by

Robo-FTP Server

Robo-FTP Server is a highly configurable, secure FTP server (FTP, FTPS, SFTP, HTTP, HTTPS) that provides a wide range of workflow automation...

October 6, 2014 by Serengeti Systems

Marc Andreesen digs into the Platform

As Danny highlights in the latest instalment of This Week's Semantic Web, Marc Andreessen has once more demonstrated that he's not content with co-authoring Mosaic, sneaking around in the 24 Hour Laundry and driving social networking Ning-style. Far from it, as he continues his recent practice of blogging thoughtfully on issues facing the industry of which we - and he - are part. Yesterday's post, The three kinds of platforms you meet on the Internet, touched on a number of issues that we've addressed here on Nodalities before, and it is well worth both reading and thinking about.As Marc suggests in his introduction; “One of the hottest of hot topics these days is the topic of Internet platforms, or platforms on the Internet. Web services APIs (application programming interfaces), web services protocols like REST and SOAP, the new Facebook platform, Amazon's web services efforts including EC2 and S3, lots of new startups talking platform (including my own company, Ning)... well, 'platform' is turning into a central theme of our industry and one that a lot of people want to think about and talk about. However, the concept of 'platform' is also the focus of a swirling vortex of confusion -- lots of platform-related concepts, many of them highly technical, bleeding together; lots of people harboring various incompatible mental images of what's about to happen in our industry as a consequence of various platforms. I think this confusion is due in part to the term 'platform' being overloaded and being used to mean many different things, and in part because there truly are a lot of moving parts at play that intersect in fascinating but complex ways.”How true. The Platform space is a great one to be in and it's brimming over with opportunity and potential; so much so that we're one company staking an awful lot upon the detail of our Platform vision. Traditionally sloppy use of language, however, has led to a situation in which unnecessary confusion is now associated with a superficially straightforward term. Some of this confusion is introduced by innocent drift in the evolving usage of a word, but far more is down to the unfortunate fashion for everyone jumping on the bandwaggon and unleashing a 'platform' of their own. At least we've been using the Platform label for our own endeavours in this area for a number of years.In his attempt to introduce some clarity, Marc's post reiterates his basic definition of an internet platform; “A 'platform' is a system that can be programmed and therefore customized by outside developers -- users -- and in that way, adapted to countless needs and niches that the platform's original developers could not have possibly contemplated, much less had time to accommodate. We have a long and proud history of this concept and this definition in the computer industry stretching all the way back to the 1950's and the original mainframe operating systems, continuing through the personal computer age and now into the Internet era. In the computer industry, this concept of platform is completely settled and widely embraced, and still holds going forward. The key term in the definition of platform is 'programmed'. If you can program it, then it's a platform. If you can't, then it's not.”Check.He then offers three 'kinds' or 'levels' of Internet platform, being careful to stress that one is not necessarily better than those it supersedes; “I call these Internet platform models 'levels', because as you go from Level 1 to Level 2 to Level 3, as I will explain, each kind of platform is harder to build, but much better for the developer. Further, as I will also explain, each level typically supersets the levels below. As I describe these three levels of Internet platform, I will walk through the pros and cons of each level as I see them. But let me say up front -- they're all good. In no way to I intend to cast aspersions on what anyone I discuss is doing. Having a platform is always better than not having a platform, period. Platforms are good, period.”Marc's three levels are;Access API “Architecturally, the key thing to understand about this kind of platform is that the developer's application code lives outside the platform -- the code executes somewhere else, on a server elsewhere on the Internet that is provided by the developer. The application calls the web services API over the Internet to access data and services provided by the platform -- by the core system -- and then the application does its thing, on its own.”Plug-in APISuperficially very similar to the 'Access API', but the host application (such as Facebook) into which a developer's application connects does the vast majority of the work around marketing; “Facebook provides a whole series of mechanisms by which Facebook users are exposed to third-party apps automatically, just by using Facebook.”Runtime Environment “In a Level 3 platform [such as Salesforce], the huge difference is that the third-party application code actually runs inside the platform -- developer code is uploaded and runs online, inside the core system. For this reason, in casual conversation I refer to Level 3 platforms as 'online platforms'.” “Put in plain English? A Level 3 platform's developers upload their code into the platform itself, which is where that code runs. As a developer on a Level 3 platform, you don't need your own servers, your own storage, your own database, your own bandwidth, nothing... in fact, often, all you will really need is a browser. The platform itself handles everything required to run your application on your behalf.”And there's more, and it's interesting stuff that Marc has clearly thought about long and hard.Reading - and rereading - Marc's post, though, I kept coming back to ideas touched upon in two posts of mine about the relative openness of different Platform solutions; “Facebook and Talis might very well be offering 'Platforms', but they're quite different in intention. Facebook's platform seems to be all about making the Facebook site as rich, compelling and sticky as possible; everything is sucked to one point. The Talis Platform, on the other hand, is about providing developers - wherever they are - with the tools and capabilities to easily link and manipulate data across and through the web. The former sits heavily 'on' the web, and feeds upon it to suck ever more into its maw. The latter is truly 'of' the web, giving a distributed community of developers and users powerful new capabilities to enmesh their applications, and to deliver capabilities at the point of need.”Regardless of its position in Marc's levels, I truly hope and believe that the Internet platforms of long-term viability will be those that embrace the Network rather than feeding rapaciously upon it; those that are of the web as we are trying so hard to be.A Platform should give the developer a helping hand. It should lift them up and provide them with a set of tools that make it easier to concentrate upon and deliver their core value whilst the Platform worries about the day-to-day mundanity that is mere context [to paraphrase Geoffrey Moore]. A Platform should enable the developer to realise the benefit of those tools and capabilities in places and manners of their own choosing, rather than expecting or requiring the developer merely to expose their assets within the bounds of whatever site(s) the Platform chooses to offer. Platform providers who realise and embrace that will be the ones to succeed.

November 1, 2007 by

Asigra Televaulting 6.2

This is a powerful suite for organisations requiring comprehensive backup technologies, continuous data protection and automated off-site storage capabilities.

February 21, 2007 by

Futures and alternatives

The Sun Ray's big strength: server based everything, is also its biggest weakness. For example, home use of Sun Rays works beautifully for most business applications because the bandwidth and server computing loads for those are relatively minor.

August 3, 2006 by

eWeek Biz Bytes: The Absurd Crackdown on Free Internet Services

Dan Briody comments on an article in theWall Street Journal discussing companies which ban public communicationservices:I'm not going to argue that these technologiesare often used for personal reasons. They are. But so are phones, and e-mail,and water coolers, and bathrooms. And they do come in handy. Instant messagingis a far quicker way to communicate than e-mail. Personal Web e-mail accountsare great backups for corporate server outages. And any company that'snot looking hard at switching their entire telecommunications system overto the IP network is already behind the game. Bandwidth concerns? Please.Within 10 years every piece of business communication will be running throughthe IP network.Now what's the technology direction forbathrooms and water coolers? On the other hand, perhaps the reason some of the companies mentioned havelocked up public communication services is that they have business-qualityproducts deployed or in plan, and are going to use enterprise connectionslike those in the new Sametime 7.5 to manage the connectivity for theirenterprise. Still, I think open and available is the way to go.  I really appreciatethat IBM acknowledges that some personal use of corporate resources isbound to happen, and not to make us punch codes into the copier/FAX touse it, not to block eddiebauer.com, and not to turn off ports for AOL/Skypeetc. Link: eWeekBiz Bytes: The Absurd Crackdown on Free Internet Services> (Thanks, boss)

April 5, 2006 by

Show n tell exposes sizeable talent

So I was incredibly impressed with thenumber of people writing about Notes on last Thursday's first "show-n-tell"day.  It's been especially cool to read some of the blogs and webpages, because they are from new voices. Petervon Stöckel wrote about browsing the web with LotusScript. KevinPettitt wrote about form validation. TimTripcony shared a design template catalog. VinceSchuurman talked about creating PDFs from Domino. EstherStrom solved an offline user's need to compact their mailbox's server copy. IanIrving built a better "save and exit" action button.VinceDiMascio published some code tips, though he's explicitly not blogging.I know that there was some talk at Lotusphere about creating an OPML forDomino bloggers.  Not sure that would solve my issue though -- attention,bandwidth, and prioritization.  There are so many great new voices,but they get added to existing bloggers...and many of us already are strugglingwith how to keep up with and read all the blogs out there.Put simply, I'm starting to struggle to figure out which bloggers to readon a regular basis.  The other struggle is how much bandwidth to giveto "new" bloggers.  I applaud all the new voices that havejoined the Notes/Domino-focused blogosphere.  But there's an abandonrate in all parts of the blogging world, and instinct tells me that someof these will go dark in just a few months. How are you managing your blogreading consumption?  I don't mean froma technology perspective -- I have a perfectly useful RSS reader.  Howare you deciding which blogs to read regularly and which ones get droppedfrom your feeds? And, last, who has the authoritativelist?  I know TheSickos.com has a lot of Domino bloggers, and thereare a few other sites, but I don't know how to best find everyone I shouldconsider reading.

February 21, 2006 by

David Jones: Notes client: email performance too slow?

David Jones discusses how he addressedNotes client performance perception issues...It'sbeen about a year since we got them on a Domino server and we probablyhave about 25-30 users on the Notes client now - mostly within the lastmonth. It's a newspaper so they deal with a lot of attachments and we hearda lot of complaints on Notes being slow and how it becomes useless whensending an email (because of the slow connection they have and they haveto wait for the email to send before being able to do anything). In hindsight,it would have been better to have a Notes server at their physical locationbut being locked into those i5 520s, can't really do that now.Yesterday my boss, the IT Manager...andI went to the newspaper and configured most of the clients with some settingsthat should increase the performance. The changes are simple and the userworks off of a local replica of their mail instead of the server.Hundredsof Notes deployments have hundreds of different ways of optimizing clientconfigurations for low-bandwidth environments.  David has come upwith some common ones -- run off a local replica, use a local directoryfor typeahead, etc.  Do you have others?

October 28, 2005 by

Napster, IBM promise cache savings

Napster says its Super Peer system, based on IBM's blade server architecture, will help bandwidth-hungry organizations, like universities and ISPs, conserve network assets.

March 10, 2004 by

Thin down with Windows 2000 Terminal Server

If you need to roll out a client-server application to a large number of people — especially where bandwidth or remote access is a consideration — one of the best ways to put Windows 2000 Server to use is to exploit its thin-client Terminal Services capabilities. Windows 2000 Terminal Services (WTS), unlike Windows NT 4.

February 1, 2001 by

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