Benefits+html+london

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London geek fashion week & remote working

I am back in the London, hammering out beautifully crafted HTML and CSS for freelance cash at a glossy, high-end agency. Vaingloriously glamorous though freelance contract work is, ultimately it is not sustainable unless you live in the lunny bin or near a railway station with direct links.

August 6, 2011 by

Google brings good tidings to Adobe Flash fans

Google’s YouTube got a huge amount of publicity when it announced support for playing videos via HTML as an alternative to using the Adobe Flash video player. But relatively little publicity followed its announcement last week that, actually, HTML5 was still deficient, and that it couldn’t offer benefits comparable to Adobe Flash.

July 4, 2010 by

Siemens Gigaset S450 IP

A reasonably-priced office handset that can be bought in multi-packs, the Gigaset S450 IP is a decent VoIP dual-mode handset. However, there are some drawbacks that limit its appeal.

November 27, 2007 by

Break-dance online with Meez

Have you ever wanted to dance, surf, and wear funky get-ups online? Meez may be for you. CNET News.com's Neha Tiwari takes a look at the new online avatar-building site and discovers the benefits of having a two-dimensional, digital persona. Meez enables users to construct an avatar and export it to their favorite HTML-formatted site.

September 8, 2006 by

Romania leads outsourcing charge

Eastern European, Middle-Eastern and Asian nations were in London this week to pitch for outsourcing business. Although it can't match the tax-free incentives of some states, Romania reckons it has other benefits to offer

June 16, 2004 by

Opera 7 for Windows

Current Opera users should definitely upgrade. Everyone else: evaluate this browser using the ad-free download period.

February 5, 2003 by

U.K. study: Missent e-mails cause embarrassment

A new survey has suggested that missent e-mails cause embarrassment more frequently than might be imagined, with one in three workers saying they've sent e-mails to the wrong recipient. The survey, carried out by consumer data company Experian in conjunction with the Direct Marketing Association (DMA), asked men and women at all levels across U.K. businesses about their e-mail habits. Among its findings: One in six bosses have fired or threatened an employee with disciplinary action because of inappropriate e-mails sent at work; 60 percent of employees surveyed admitted to reading personal e-mails while at work; and 60 percent of employees admitted to sending e-mails to someone sitting next to them to ask a question. ZDNet U.K.'s Andrew Swinton reported from London. To read the full story, visit http://news.zdnet.co.uk/story/0,,t269-s2111536,00.html.

June 7, 2002 by

U.K. lawmakers push to split BT

Regulatory action may be taken against British Telecommunications in an attempt to increase competition in the United Kingdom's broadband market, according to an influential group of lawmakers. The select committee has urged the Office of Telecommunications--the U.K. telecom regulator known as Oftel--and its forthcoming replacement, the Office of Communications (OFCOM), to consider separating BT's network business from the rest of the company. The network is BT's physical infrastructure--including local exchanges and cables--as opposed to its service-based operations, such as BTopenworld. One of the benefits of this separation, the committee believes, is that it might bring down broadband prices. The committee's advice was delivered in a report published Wednesday; it echoes a widespread belief among BT's competitors, which say broadband prices would likely fall if a third party owned BT's fixed-line network. BT isn't permitted to sell any products at a loss--an attempt to prevent the company undercutting rivals to boost market share. ZDNet U.K.'s Graeme Wearden reported from London. To read the full story visit ZDNet U.K.

May 1, 2002 by

Dell laptops to hold GPRS wireless

LONDON--Dell Computer customers in the United Kingdom will soon have notebooks equipped with wide-area wireless access. From mid-March, U.K. consumers will be able to order laptops with GPRS (Global Packet Radio Service) connections that provide always-on, wide-area wireless access to the company network or the Internet. The key benefits will be the ability to send and receive e-mail, browse the Web, and access corporate databases from almost anywhere in the United Kingdom. Later, as roaming agreements fall into place, the service also will be available in other European countries. --Charles McLellan, ZDUK

February 12, 2002 by

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