Collaboration+skills

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Create Children Book

This cool app enables kids to create their own stories using a huge collection (nearly 3000 unique assets) of backgrounds, characters,...

December 4, 2014 by BodhaGuru

ICT skills foundering on poor data and disinterest

Lingering doubts about information and communications technology (ICT) careers, inadequate ICT teaching, an ineffective industry reporting structure and poor collaboration between public and private sectors have all been blamed for the poor state of Australia's ICT skills tracking in a report released yesterday.

June 21, 2006 by

lekkimworld: Is the lack of Java skills in the Notes/Domino developer community the Achilles´ heel of IBM?

Mikkel Heisterberg totally gets it in termsof where Notes is going and some of the opportunities, and challenges,of Notes in the "Hannover" release (emphasis mine):Thoughsupported it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to build the kindsof composite, networked applications that will be possible with Hannoverusing LotusScript. You'll need Java for these kinds of applications. Thisbrings us back to IBM since this fact will be a real Achilles' heal [sic]when it comes to the adoption and getting the real benefit from the newHannover client. The success of the Hannover client and the applicationspossible will rest on getting the customers to use and new features andbegin to develop composite applications. I don'tknow if Mikkel has my phone tapped, but this is exactly the message I'vebeen delivering to colleagues over the last couple of weeks.  It iscritical that Notes"Hannover" demonstratebest-in-class usability and all the other great things coming, but themain driver for upgrades will be the new value in  "Hannover"-- the fact that for the first time, Notes is more than just a client forDomino. This is a complex thought.  The attention paid to "Hannover"since its announcement last May has been primarily around the major refreshof the user interface.  This gets everybody's attention , eye candyalways does.  But "improved user interface", no matter howamazing the new UI is (and from everything I've seen so far, it totallyrocks), won't necessarily be enough for the CFO to approve an IT projectto upgrade Notes.  Other new things, like activitesand compositeapplications -- now it getsinteresting.   If you remember back a few years to when Lotus first announced "collaborationfor J2EE", one of the driving factors for starting to build what isnow known as Workplace Collaboration Services/Workplace Designer/WorkplaceManaged Client was the coming market shift to Java/J2EE as a mainstreamapplication development language.  I disagree with Mikkel that IBMhasn't been promoting Java to Lotus developers -- look at Lotusphere agendasfor three years running now, and it's clear from jumpstarts to the breakoutsand BoFs that IBM has.  But maybe still not enough.  Becausemany many organizations report now that they are building all new applicationsin J2EE (or in .NET or both), and are less-inclined to build new apps inanything else -- no matter how easy it is to get a Notes application upand running. "Hannover" represents an opportunity to unify two applicationdevelopment worlds -- Notes developers building Notes apps and Java developersbuilding Java apps.The community at large needs to skill-upand get to grips with Java. Now is a good a time as any to get started- rather sooner than later. The reward will be apparent once Hannover isreleased. Composite applications represent a transformation-- Notes does more than just Domino applications.  Understanding thisnow will prepare for "Hannover", and how to better leverage yourNotes investment in the future. Link:lekkimworld: Is the lack of Java skills in the Notes/Domino developer communitythe Achilles' heel of IBM? >

March 27, 2006 by

CRN: IBM´s Collaboration Chief Talks Domino, Workplace Game Plan

A very long interview with LotusGM Mike Rhodin.  If you've been wondering what Mike has been up toin his first few months leading Lotus, this interview reveals a lot.  Hetalks about everything from ND7 adoption, competition, Workplace adoption,branding, developer opportunities, Linux, and more.  A few examples:"I'mcomfortable with the progress we've made with Workplace... You'll see usposition the open standards-based, components-based composition model stuffas the front end to the SOA architecture IBM's bringing to the market.That will start to clarify things for people because it's where interactionand collaboration services meet business process through the SOA framework.When we started talking about Workplace being collaboration in the contextof business process, people thought we'd start to implement business processthings in workplace, and weren't' thinking about it as the front end tothe business process stuff we're doing in another part of Software Group"...Rhodin: Since the day I got toLotus, when I headed up the engineering teams, I made a promise to customersthat I was not going to create a cliff that they had to jump off to getto the next thing. I was going to provide a smooth path forward and guaranteeapplications moving forward and I believe I've delivered on that promiseCRN : So if you were talkingto a traditional Notes/Domino ISV, say Percussion, what do you tell themto do going forward? Stick with Domino? Rhodin: What you'll see unveiledat Lotusphere and in the coming year is how these things will start toconverge. We've been really working hard with our customers to understandwhat seamless evolution means to you. And what we get back is it's choiceand flexibility about when I do what. No forced dates or forced migrations.If your skills are in Domino applications, we'll carry those skills forwardand those assets forward. Scripting will continue to work. New releasesof Domino coming out. ...If people want to keep their skills on DominoDesigner building new apps, we're actually seeing more people buildingthis year than last the previous year people are more comfortable withthe longevity of the platform and no one's come up with a better solutionfor building apps faster than Domino Designer. In order to bridge the skills gap forthose moving toward J2EE technologies, we came out with Workplace Designer,which brought the skills of the Domino developer to a new tool that wouldbe familiar in a couple of hours to build apps except what gets generatedout of the bottom is J2EE components that fit into it without ever havingto write any Java code. CRN : Given the continued confusionaround Workplace/Domino, will you pull back on the Workplace messagingat all? Rhodin: We're going to continueto try to clarify it. The key thing is we believe the whole composite appmodel around workplace is fundamental to how SOAs are going to be builtin the future. What we've focused on all along is positioning he portaland workplace stuff as the interaction surfaces for SOA. That's alwaysbeen the design point Various analysts have written some prettynutty stuff. I can't believe we were in the same meetings. They keep tryingto spin it back into "This is just a new definition of e-mail, newdefinition of instant messaging." My point is, no. Those things becomeservices. They're commodities. No matter how you look at them, it's whatyou do with them that becomes interesting. And making those componentsavailable as part of this composite application model versus a separatee-mail system or separate IM system is what makes it interesting Just as when Notes came out 15 yearsago, no one knew what groupware or collaboration was. It was the firstset of applications that were built that started to show people the way.We're heading into that phase. Link: CRN:IBM's Collaboration Chief Talks Domino, Workplace Game Plan>

December 24, 2005 by

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