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Malware Watch: Free Mac OS X screensavers bundled with spyware

Researchers from Intego have discovered the OSX/OpinionSpy spyware in 29 free Mac OS X screensavers currently online at 7art-screensavers(dot)com. Upon execution it sends data about files it has scanned locally, and also sends e-mail addresses, iChat message headers and URLs, as well as other data.

June 2, 2010 by

Dropbox releases iPhone app

One of my favorite Mac OS X apps is Dropbox, a small, free application that allows you store files on the cloud and access, share, sync and download files on the go. It's great for storing frequently accessed files and for sharing said files with your closest amigos.

September 30, 2009 by

Apple confirms malware protection in Snow Leopard (Updated)

Apple has confirmed reports that Mac OS 10.6 includes File Quarantine technology to scan for malware in files downloaded by Safari, iChat and Mail. As it turns out, it's been around since 2005. Anyone else find it ironic that Apple's latest television ads knock Windows' "viruses and headaches?"

August 26, 2009 by

Apple warns of Mac attack risk via image files

Apple today warned that opening or viewing image files could lead to remote code execution attacks against Mac OS X users.In an update that contains fixes for a total of 19 documented vulnerabilities, Apple said malicious hackers could rig PNG (Portable Network Graphics) and other images to take complete control of unpatched Mac systems.

August 5, 2009 by

Sun adds Apple native support to StarOffice 9

Sun on Monday announced that StarOffice 9 was available with native Mac OS X support.The company's latest StarOffice (statement) gets a revamp throughout and makes it easier to edit PDF files, blog and publish wikis.

November 16, 2008 by

IT Dojo: Disable USB storage under OS X or Windows

Hollywood would have IT pros believe that the biggest threat to network security comes from international super hackers or high school kids trying to download games like global thermonuclear war. In reality, we face a more mundane threat--our end users, particularly those wielding USB storage devices.These pocket-sized devices can store a large amount of data. But even if your users aren't planning to cart off sensitive company files, USB storage devices (external hard drives, camera, memory stick, MP3 players, etc.) can be a headache in other ways. Employees may use your networks to download music to their USB-based MP3 players. New USB flash drives, such as SanDisk's U3 smart drives, can even run software directly from the device--a perfect tool for the end-user who wants to run unauthorized software on your network.If your concerned about USB storage devices on your network and don’t feel a written policy alone will protect your data, disabling the devices is your next step.In this IT Dojo video, Bill Detwiler, TechRepublic's Head Technology Editor, shows you how to disable USB storage devices on both Apple OS X and Windows. The United States National Security Agency (NSA) described the process in a March 2008 document from the agency's Information Assurance Directorate.Once you've watched this IT Dojo video, you can read the original TechRepublic article, download PDF version of this tip, and learn more about mitigating the risks poses by USB storage devices from our IT Dojo blog.

April 28, 2008 by

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