Infiniband+server

Showing results 1 to 9 of 9

Oracle OpenWorld: Scott McNealy must be smiling

Oracle Chairman Larry Ellison opened this week's Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco with details on the Exalogic Elastic Cloud. The system, built on 360 64-bit x86 processor cores, is interconnected with an InfiniBand-based I/O fabric and solid-state storage with Oracle WebLogic Server, other enterprise Java Oracle middleware products and a choice of Oracle Solaris or Oracle Linux operating system software.

September 21, 2010 by

HP and Oracle team up on 'data warehouse appliances' that re-architect database-storage landscape

The reason for the 10x to 72x performance improvements cited by Ellison are do to bringing the "intelligence" closer to the data, that is bringing the Exadata Programmable Storage Server appliance into close proximity to the Oracle database servers, and then connecting them through InfiniBand connections. In essence, this architecture mimics some of the performance value created by cloud computing environments like Google, with its MapReduce technology.

September 24, 2008 by

Mellanox fills Intel's InfiniBand void

Mellanox, a start-up building chips for the budding InfiniBand high-speed networking technology, is stepping in to fill a void left by the departure of Intel from the market. Mellanox will announce Monday that it's shipping prototypes of new chips to companies such as JNI to build adapter cards to endow servers with InfiniBand connections. The chips, Mellanox's second-generation design, are coming just as Intel announced that it's withdrawing from the InfiniBand chip market. Mellanox's new chip is aimed at the same lower-end server market in which Intel was interested. --Stephen Shankland, Special to ZDNet News

June 3, 2002 by

InfiniBand boost to supercomputing

Two companies backing the InfiniBand standard have taken steps to move the high-speed networking technology closer to reality, the companies announced Tuesday at the Intel Developer Forum. Chipmaker Mellanox has revamped the Beowulf technique for making cheap supercomputers, using InfiniBand connections between computers instead of the Ethernet network that prevails today. The system uses the Message Passing Interface (MPI) communication standard common in Beowulf clusters. The software ran on Mellanox's Nitro computer, which has 16 thin server "blades" in a single 7-inch-thick cabinet. Also Tuesday, Banderacom announced new product kits to help companies use its InfiniBand chip designs. One is for fiber-optic connections to the current "1x" version of InfiniBand; the other is for the second-generation "4x" version with copper wire connections, the company said. Products with InfiniBand 4x connections are expected in 2003, the company said. --Stephen Shankland, Special to ZDNet News

February 26, 2002 by

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