London+skills+linux

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LSE's Linux trading platform hit by glitches

The London Stock Exchange's migration to a new Linux-based trading platform has been dogged by problems, affecting brokers for third parties, who do not provide advice.On Thursday, Selftrade told ZDNet UK it has been experiencing problems in displaying correct prices for certain London Stock Exchange (LSE) shares.

February 17, 2011 by

LSE migrates to Millennium Exchange trading platform

The London Stock Exchange has completed a move to a Linux-based trading platform for its UK cash markets.The SUSE Enterprise Linux platform, called Millennium Exchange, runs on commodity Intel hardware and has been designed to reduce trading latency, the London Stock Exchange Group (LSEG) announced on Monday.

February 14, 2011 by

Nokia could drop Symbian for Maemo on N-series

Nokia could drop Symbian for the Maemo Linux operating system on its flagship N-series handsets by 2012, according to Maemo marketing staff.A report published on Wednesday on The Really Mobile Project quotes Maemo staff from an event last night in London.

November 18, 2009 by

Gov't confusion over national 2Mbps commitment

Confusion has broken out within government circles over the 2Mbps universal broadband coverage that was called for by Stephen Carter's Digital Britain report.At a Parliament and Internet conference held in London on Thursday, the head of broadband policy for Lord Mandelson's Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) said the government had "never said there will be 2Mbps [provided to UK citizens] at any given time".

October 15, 2009 by

ZDNet seeks Java and LAMP expert

The veep of software engineering here at ZDNet just pinged me to let me know we're looking for a senior software engineer and that Java and LAMP (Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP) skills are a must.  The person who takes this job will undoubtedly be providing some of the technical muscle ZDNet needs to continue growing its blogging operation (amongst other duties).

January 12, 2006 by

CRN: IBM´s Collaboration Chief Talks Domino, Workplace Game Plan

A very long interview with LotusGM Mike Rhodin.  If you've been wondering what Mike has been up toin his first few months leading Lotus, this interview reveals a lot.  Hetalks about everything from ND7 adoption, competition, Workplace adoption,branding, developer opportunities, Linux, and more.  A few examples:"I'mcomfortable with the progress we've made with Workplace... You'll see usposition the open standards-based, components-based composition model stuffas the front end to the SOA architecture IBM's bringing to the market.That will start to clarify things for people because it's where interactionand collaboration services meet business process through the SOA framework.When we started talking about Workplace being collaboration in the contextof business process, people thought we'd start to implement business processthings in workplace, and weren't' thinking about it as the front end tothe business process stuff we're doing in another part of Software Group"...Rhodin: Since the day I got toLotus, when I headed up the engineering teams, I made a promise to customersthat I was not going to create a cliff that they had to jump off to getto the next thing. I was going to provide a smooth path forward and guaranteeapplications moving forward and I believe I've delivered on that promiseCRN : So if you were talkingto a traditional Notes/Domino ISV, say Percussion, what do you tell themto do going forward? Stick with Domino? Rhodin: What you'll see unveiledat Lotusphere and in the coming year is how these things will start toconverge. We've been really working hard with our customers to understandwhat seamless evolution means to you. And what we get back is it's choiceand flexibility about when I do what. No forced dates or forced migrations.If your skills are in Domino applications, we'll carry those skills forwardand those assets forward. Scripting will continue to work. New releasesof Domino coming out. ...If people want to keep their skills on DominoDesigner building new apps, we're actually seeing more people buildingthis year than last the previous year people are more comfortable withthe longevity of the platform and no one's come up with a better solutionfor building apps faster than Domino Designer. In order to bridge the skills gap forthose moving toward J2EE technologies, we came out with Workplace Designer,which brought the skills of the Domino developer to a new tool that wouldbe familiar in a couple of hours to build apps except what gets generatedout of the bottom is J2EE components that fit into it without ever havingto write any Java code. CRN : Given the continued confusionaround Workplace/Domino, will you pull back on the Workplace messagingat all? Rhodin: We're going to continueto try to clarify it. The key thing is we believe the whole composite appmodel around workplace is fundamental to how SOAs are going to be builtin the future. What we've focused on all along is positioning he portaland workplace stuff as the interaction surfaces for SOA. That's alwaysbeen the design point Various analysts have written some prettynutty stuff. I can't believe we were in the same meetings. They keep tryingto spin it back into "This is just a new definition of e-mail, newdefinition of instant messaging." My point is, no. Those things becomeservices. They're commodities. No matter how you look at them, it's whatyou do with them that becomes interesting. And making those componentsavailable as part of this composite application model versus a separatee-mail system or separate IM system is what makes it interesting Just as when Notes came out 15 yearsago, no one knew what groupware or collaboration was. It was the firstset of applications that were built that started to show people the way.We're heading into that phase. Link: CRN:IBM's Collaboration Chief Talks Domino, Workplace Game Plan>

December 24, 2005 by

Microsoft: No Office on Linux 'at this time'

Microsoft has no plans to tweak its Office productivity suite for Linux anytime soon, despite the growing popularity of open source on the desktop, according to a company executive.Speaking at the LinuxWorld conference in London on Wednesday, Nick McGrath, Microsoft's head of platform strategy, said that the software maker had no intention of porting Office to any of the Linux desktop distributions.

October 5, 2005 by

Lloyd's may offer open-source indemnity

Lloyd's of London, the oldest insurance organisation in the world, may soon underwrite open-source software against claims of intellectual property infringement.The insurance would be available through brokers to companies and organisations worried about being sued over their use of open-source software such as Linux by companies that might claim it infringes their intellectual property rights.

August 15, 2005 by

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