Monitor+pc

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Wise Care 365 Free

Wise Care 365 provides the best solution to improve your PC's performance. It not only promises a dead easy use but also brings the...

11 hours ago by WiseCleaner

£15 Raspberry Pi survives Quake

The UK-based charity Raspberry Pi, which hopes to supply schools worldwide with ultra-low-cost computers, has shown off the current version of its $25 computer running Quake 3.The device itself is only about the size of a credit card and is designed to connect to a PC, monitor, or a touchscreen to create a cheap tablet.

August 30, 2011 by

The future of...thermostats

The household thermostat has always been difficult to program--wasting energy and driving up your utility bill. But ZDNet correspondent Sumi Das explains how new networking technologies will one day connect your thermostat and meter to your PC so you are better able to track, monitor, and analyze the energy usage in your home.

February 16, 2010 by

The Future Of...Thermostats

The household thermostat has always been difficult to program--wasting energy and driving up your utility bill. But ZDNet correspondent Sumi Das explains how new networking technologies will one day connect your thermostat and meter to your PC, so you are better able to track, monitor, and analyze the energy usage in your home.

February 16, 2010 by

Skype Spy USB Edition

You do not need to be a computer whiz to monitor your child's or employees activity. You just need Skype Spy USB Edition program which...

1 day ago by SoftComfort

Dell Vostro 320

While a few tweaks such as an in-built wireless receiver for keyboard/mouse and a video input so it could double as a monitor for your laptop would be nice, if you're looking for a cheap all-in-one PC, it's hard to ignore the Vostro 320 as an option.

October 26, 2009 by

WebWatcher

View PC activity anywhere, anytime. Only WebWatcher sends recorded PC activity to a secure online account. See all keystrokes, screenshots,...

3 days ago by Awareness Technologies

Qualcomm's Kayak "PC alternative" pictured

Here's a picture of Kayak, the "PC alternative" for emerging markets that Qualcomm announced yesterday. It looks pretty much the way the company described it: sort of a cross between the Apple Mac Mini--bring your own monitor, keyboard and mouse--and the OLPC's XO laptop with its rabbit-ear antennae.

November 13, 2008 by

Toshiba: Feel free to trade in more gadgets. Lots more.

Can't figure out what to do with your old laptop, tablet PC, monitor, projector, camera, camcorder, server, home audio receiver, mobile phone, car audio system, home electronics device, global positioning satellite receiver, MP3 player, personal digital assistant or game system? (Whew.

October 1, 2008 by

Virtual labs and education

Yesterday, I asked for people to share their thoughts via a guest blog on virtualization in Ed Tech.   Guest blogger Erik Josowitz provided us with the following (thanks, Erik).  Feel free to talk back or submit your own guest blog with some specific experiences or implementation details. Virtualization is great tool but, like any Swiss-Army knife, success with it depends on the task at hand. One of the places that people get into trouble with virtualization is when they try to use out-of-the-box virtual infrastructure with non-technical audiences. Virtualization is a great solution but often is not a complete solution.In education we've frequently seen challenges that look like appropriate places to implement a virtualization solution, only to find that the end-result is not fully usable by the intended audience. One example is providing hands-on lab environments to support application training. Success in the workforce today depends on high-level application skills and there is no better way for students to attain those skills than through hands-on use of the software applications. Many educational institutions provide computer lab environments to help support their student population and provide access to necessary software applications. Many of these lab environments have become the source of IT management problems as they become virus-ridden, get subverted as distribution sites for pirated software or music, or just plain have the normal IT management issues associated with a shared resource in a public environment. For many institutions their student population brings with them their own PCs which solves one problem but creates another. The lab issues diminish but the problems of providing secure access to software (and software licenses) often takes its place.The answer, we've found, is virtual lab management - using virtualization to deliver secure computing environments as a shared resource. Virtual labs allow administrators to serve up a clean and unchangeable environment for each student - in the lab or on their own PC - on-demand. This makes it easy to provide access to applications that students either can't afford individually or that their home PCs cannot support. It makes it simple to track and monitor lab usage and to control the use of resources so that systems are not subverted into file servers. Virtual lab management sits on top of virtualization (from Microsoft or VMware) and tells it what to deliver and to who. It makes it easy for non-technical users to select the types of applications they need from a menu and to gain access to those environments without needing to understand virtualization, networking, hosts systems or anything about how it gets delivered. Best of all, virtual labs make it easy to manage capacity. By scheduling time in the lab environment the shared resource is managed for maximum utilization. If more capacity is needed it is simple to add additional resources to the system. The end-users simply see an increase in availability.Virtualization may not be a panacea for educational institutions, but for a subset of problems, a centralized virtual lab may enable technology administrators to focus their time and attention on enabling learning rather than administering systems.

December 19, 2007 by

Intel developing exercise-tracking tech

From Intel Research Labs' open house on June 20: CNET News.com's Tom Krazit talks with Intel Senior Scientist Beverly Harrison about technology she's helping to develop that will monitor the type of exercise someone is getting. The data could be sent to a cell phone or PC from a device worn by the individual.

June 27, 2007 by

ACT govt plans AU$80m hardware refresh

The Australian Capital Territory government has signalled it will sign new suppliers for PC, server and printer hardware in mid-2007, in arrangements collectively worth between AU$80 million and AU$100 million.The territory's shared services arm InTACT briefed industry on the plans in Canberra last week, saying it planned to ink five separate new contracts for the supply of desktop, server, monitor, printer and multifunction device and laptop hardware.

April 3, 2007 by

PolyCom VSX 3000

The VSX 3000 saves space and hassle for regular video conferencers by allowing calls to be made from the desktop. Just don't knock it around too much.

July 14, 2004 by

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