Nasa+iphone+earth

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Verizon reveals iPhone 4 hotspot pricing

Remember that cool WiFi hotspot feature that was revealed at the Verizon iPhone 4 event? Remember how we all salivated? Well, it's time for our dreams to come crashing back down to earth as we get a look at the pricing.

January 25, 2011

Apple cripples GPS in Egyptian iPhones

A report in The New York Times claims that Apple has disabled the GPS functionality of the iPhone 3G at the request of the Egyptian government due to concerns over possible anti-military/anti-Egyptian applications.What on earth in an "anti-Egyptian application" anyway?

December 10, 2008 by

Speak into your iPhone for fast Google search results

Google continues its efforts to optimize the mobile experience on the iPhone with their new speech recognition search application that will lets iPhone users ask questions verbally and receive back Google search results. This new search functionality will also take advantage of the iPhone location-based technology and sometimes give you back local results. Other recent improvements in Google services include new search results pages optimized for the iPhone and Google Earth for the iPhone.

November 13, 2008 by

Google Earth hits the iPhone

Corrected and amended headline: Google launched Google Earth for the iPhone and iPod touch and the reviews are great. The rollout prompts a question.

October 26, 2008 by

Ghostly ring found circling dead star

An international team of scientists has found a strange ring around a dead star by using images taken by NASA's Spitzer space telescope. This star, called SGR 1900+14, belongs to a class of objects known as magnetars. According to NASA, a magnetar is 'a highly magnetized neutron star and the remnant of a brilliant supernova explosion signaling the death throes of a massive star.' So far, about a dozen magnetars have been found. An amazing thing about these stellar objects is their magnetic field. One of the researchers said that 'magnetars possess magnetic fields a million billion times stronger than the magnetic field of the Earth.' But read more...

June 1, 2008 by

Using satellite imagery to explore ancient Mexico

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) is using satellite imagery to peer into the ancient Mexican past. Bill Middleton, an archeologist, is teaming up with computer scientists to build the most detailed landscape map of the southern state of Oaxaca in order to learn more about the Zapotec civilization. According to Middleton, who probably spoke only about Mexico, the Zapotec people 'had the first writing system, the first state society, the first cities.' The project is funded by National Geographic and NASA which is providing three years of images taken by Earth Observing 1 and Landsat satellites. But read more...

May 14, 2008 by

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