Netbook+iphone+intel

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The History of the iPhone gets animated

Our Tech Family Tree — History of the iPhone has been out now for just over a week and unlike the iPhone 4 we've been delighted by its reception.The best bit has been doling out the posters at various events — Jack Clark managed to donate a couple at the Intel Developer Forum to passing execs, while I've been peppering the occasional freebie around London — and seeing people get caught up in this or that bit of information which fires their interest.

September 23, 2011 by

Comparing Netbook Desktops - Part 4, MeeGo

After having looked at three more or less "traditional" Linux desktops on a netbook - Ubuntu Unity, KDE Plasma Netbook and Jolicloud - now I am going to look at a very un-traditional desktop, MeeGo. Descended from the Moblin project, and now being developed jointly by Intel and Nokia, MeeGo is intended to be a user interface for the entire range of mobile products, including netbooks, tablets, smart phones and more.

November 9, 2010 by

Dell's flipping Inspiron Duo Tablet brings back memories

Dell showed its forthcoming Inspiron Duo Tablet at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF 2010) but it would be nice if it called it the Dell Flip, or at least the Dell Transformer. It’s a convertible -- it works either as a netbook PC or as an entertainment tablet -- but takes a different approach to swivelling the screen, as show in the video below.

September 17, 2010 by

Samsung N150 Plus Netbook - Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.04

The obvious first choice in loading Linux on my new Samsung netbook is the Ubuntu Netbook Edition. This should be particularly well-suited, because UNE was originally developed specifically for Intel Atom based netbook, and although it has been improved over the past couple of releases so that it works on others (such as my HP 2133 Mini-Note), I believe that it still works "best" on Atom-based systems.

August 31, 2010 by

Intel sponsoring contest to develop best netbook games

Gaming doesn't leap to mind when you think about all of a netbook's various uses, unless you're talking about solitaire or Minesweeper. That's especially because you're dealing with integrated graphics that limit the system ability to display all the visual complexity of current games.

August 11, 2010 by

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