Reader+pc

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ePub Reader for Windows

ePub Reader for Windows is a windows utility that view or convert epub e-books. With ePub Reader for Windows users can read epub e-books...

October 13, 2014 by HAN Software

Android and Facebook attract more malware attacks

Android smartphones and Facebook are attracting more attention from malware writers, according to the AVG Community Powered Threat Report Q1 2011, which is a sort of "online neighborhood watch". In the PC market, there has been "an explosion in Blackhole Exploit Kits", which are mainly used to attack sercurity flaws in Oracle's Java and Adobe Reader.

April 20, 2011 by

How to beat the 2.5% VAT rise!

Sorry to my international reader about this UK-centric headline but it is rather topical today! If you are unfortunate enough to be running Windows on your PC, there is still a way to save yourself hundreds of pounds/dollars/your-local-currency.

January 4, 2011 by

Pages to PDF Converter

Pages files are created on an Apple Macintosh computer, often using iWorks Pages program, an Office-like program that does word-processing,...

May 28, 2014 by HAN Software

Amazon Kindle DX Global Wireless Edition

The Kindle DX is too large to carry comfortably, and Amazon has made very little effort to customise it for the UK market. We like the ability to download content over the air, but otherwise prefer e-book readers that eschew the bells and whistles.

March 4, 2010 by

PC ePub Reader

PC ePub Reader is a powerful free ePub Reader for Windows. You can read DRM-free ePub books on your PC and notebook. Full support...

February 23, 2014 by Epingsoft

Sony rolls out EPUB content, makes B&N nook transition easy and international

Readers here know I have my B&N Nook (see my initial hands-on and am very happy with it for several reasons. I wrote about the ability to load up and read all of my Fictionwise, eReader, Shortcovers, and public library content. I now have great news for those Sony Reader owners who are thinking about picking up a B&N nook, but don't want to lose all of their Sony Reader content. I have over 150 books on my Sony Reader 505 and today Sony launched new PC/Mac clients (renamed the eBook Store from Sony to the Reader Store) for managing your content and converted most all of their titles to the standard EPUB format. While this is EXCELLENT for people like me who have lots of purchased Sony Reader content, another part of this story is that people in Canada, the UK, and a few other countries can simply buy books from the Sony Reader Store and transfer them quickly to your nook with your PC or Mac.

December 11, 2009 by

FOTOBOX Plus creates slideshows from USB device

Honestech, a digital media software company, has just released FOTOBOX Plus, a USB device that enables the creation of multimedia slideshows from photos and videos. The gadget contains an integrated memory card reader and embedded PC software (thus, not compatible with Mac OS) with Flash memory, which can automatically run without any installation.

October 15, 2009 by

Sony eBook Store version 3.0 software now available for Apple and Windows

I was just reading my friend Lisa's first thoughts and video of the Sony Reader Touch Edition (PRS-600) and saw she mentioned the new Sony eBook Store 3.0 software would be available this Thursday or Friday. Well, Sony surprised us with an early release and if you go visit the eBook Store download site you will find both Mac and PC downloads for the latest 3.0 version. I downloaded it onto my MacBook Pro and downloaded all of my purchased content to my MBP too since I like to burn a backup DVD of my purchases.

August 25, 2009 by

With Power Pack 2, Windows Home Server Finally Embraces Media Center

[Update: Thanks to the reader who pointed out that Windows Home Server doesn't load on your Media Center PC, but will communicate with it through the Media Center Connector app.]When Microsoft first released its Windows Home Server (WHS) OS, it seemed like a strong linkage between it and Windows Media Center would be one of the first things the company would have wanted to include.

March 24, 2009 by

Google Chrome to be pre-installed on PCs in 2009?

Google is reportedly thinking about cutting deals with PC makers to have its Chrome browser pre-installed on new computers, a move that could position the Internet giant to not only boost its presence in search but also put some of its branded apps - Gmail, Google Docs, Google Reader and others - in front of new users.According to a report in The Times, Google will likely start working those deals after it pulls the "beta" label from Chrome in early 2009.

November 21, 2008 by

Swiping a card to check your health

U.S. researchers have developed a prototype device of a card-swipe for medical tests which could be used to check for hundreds of diseases simultaneously. It should act as 'a credit card-swipe machine to scan a card loaded with microscopic blood, saliva or urine samples.' The current prototype is about the size of a PC, but a future commercial version should look like a credit card reader. And according to the researchers, results could be available in minutes instead of hours or weeks. Besides health care, such a device has potential applications for homeland security or environmental monitoring. This device is based on giant magnetoresistance (GMR), a phenomenon discovered in 1988 by French and German researchers who shared the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics, and which is used to read data on computer hard drives and by MP3 readers. But read more...

November 5, 2008 by

Build a Vista-compatible office PC for $305 (software not included)

A reader set me an email challenge the other day - put together a cheap yet well spec-ed and relatively powerful office PC that's up to the challenge of running Vista. To make the challenge even harder, the whole package (PC, keyboard, mouse, LCD panel and Vista OS) had to come in at under $600 (the reader wanted to build five of these systems). Can it be done? Read on to find out.

March 7, 2008 by

Relativity and why we still need new computers

One reader of my last post on the saturation of the PC market in Japan (and developed markets in general) took exception to my language regarding extremely inexpensive PCs and their utility for ed tech. He wrote:I think we need to be realistic about what both "extremely inexpensive" and filling the needs of students "remarkably well" mean.

November 5, 2007 by

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