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Enterprise Skills Management

Enterprise Skills Management (ESM) is a cutting edge solution for businesses to boost their business performance. ESM enables innovative...

December 9, 2014 by 3D Talent Services

Using Windows XP is a waste of money, says IDC

IDC has published a white paper that explains "Why Sticking with Windows XP is a Bad Idea". It claims that upgrading from Windows XP to Windows 7 pays for itself in a year, in increased productivity and reduced support costs, and provides a return on investment (ROI) of 137 percent over three years.

May 28, 2012 by

Making the security ROI model work

Chief Security Officers face a challenging quandary at budget-time because the traditional return on investment (ROI) model falls apart when it is applied to security products — but as that is the only language budget-approvers speak, what is a CSO to do?

April 9, 2008 by

Best journalist question of the day

I've been hiding in meeting rooms muchof yesterday and today, talking with the press about this week's announcementsand the state of the market.  Yesterday afternoon, I met with threeJapanese journalists for what was one of the best interviews I've donein a long time.These guys were prepared!  Theyhad excellent questions which reflected the Japanese cultural tendencyto think long-term and in multiple directions.  I don't speak Japanese,but I know a few of the key phrases and intonations of the language.  Combinethat with the "Engrish" (romanji character) pronunciation ofmany of the technical words, and I was able to understand most of the questionseven before they had been translated.  The eye contact was intense,the laughter reflected in the creases in the corner of the eye, and itall worked despite my constant reminder to myself to say "hai"at appropriate points and never to use the word "no".So what was the question worth blogging? It was, essentially -- four years ago, you announced a J2EE-basedcollaboration strategy.  It was a two-lane highway.  Today wehear a lot of news about ongoing investment and enhancement in the coreNotes/Domino technologies, and no two-lane highway.  What has changedand why?I love this question (and I told theJapanese that I do).  The question is asked at user groups, by journalists,by CIOs.  It requires a philosophical answer, but is one that I getasked enough that I've honed the philosophy.When Al Zollar stood on that stage fouryears ago and announced collaboration for J2EE, a number of things drovethe decision.  The primary two still make perfect sense today.  1) Software is becoming componentized.  You can see it in the way IBM and others build solutions today.The new Sametime uses an Eclipse framework, a Codec from someone else,etc.  Making components to provide collaborative capabilities is agood idea.  2) J2EE, or alternatively .NET, havebecome the primary languages for application developers.  The forecastin 2002 was that by 2005, 80% of all new apps would be written in one orthe other.  I don't think it happened that way -- for a variety ofreasons, I think the number is lower.  But it is still a fact thata new computer science graduate from unversity is more likely to be focusedon Java or .NET than anything else.  And convincing them learn todevelop in Domino Designer is a challenge, because it's "proprietary"to one (albeit incredibly popular) platform.So we had to start getting behind oneof these development platforms, and as IBM, it makes sense that we choseJava.  The Workplace Collaboration Services, and many of the Workplace-brandedproducts, reflect this.  But a funny thing happened on the way toJ2EE-based collaboration -- market adoption of Notes/Domino continued,and more importantly, existing customers grew their Domino investmentsthrough larger user populations and increasing numbers of applications.The problem with the "two-lanehighway" was that there was an implication you would eventually haveto move to the other lane, and it would take some superhuman feat to doso.  There's no ROI in migration, and IBM -- unlike our primary competitor-- just don't believe in it.  So instead of following separate andparallel development paths, we started finding ways to integrate the new,Java-based, componentized technologies with the existing Notes/Domino products.This results in several things you saw/heardyesterday -- at the client side, Notes integrates with the Workplace ManagedClient as a plug-in.  The next version of Domino will integrate portaltechnologies into the server.  They are still Notes and Domino-- running every Notes application that you do today, with no architecturalchanges required.  But now we integrate the Activities model intoNotes; we integrate the components into Notes (Sametime 7.5 will providethe IM plug-in for Notes "Hannover").  It becomes the bestof all worlds -- continuing investment and innovation for the productsin use by 61,000 customers today, while adopting for the "nextgen"of Java-based programming.  Tools like IBM Workplace Designer helpbridge the two, by providing a Java-based development tool that works likeDomino Designer.  In a future version, it will even build rich clientapplications.I have been at Lotus through this entiretransition and journey.  And when I see what the development teamhas done to leverage our strengths and heritage, combined with toolingfor the future, it makes me incredibly proud to be a part of all of this. We're doing what's right for customers, not just what's convenientfor us (whehter that be a 64-bit migration or an obsolesence of existingproduct APIs).  It takes more work, but the best and the brightestare making it happen.  And the best part is, it has made Notes evenmore powerful, and more useful, for the next sixteen years of its lifecycle.

January 24, 2006 by

40,000 applications can´t be wrong

A recent case study on ibm.com just crossedmy desk...The environment is so valuable that today DaimlerChryslerdeploys 40,000 Lotus Notes and Domino applications spread over nearly everyaspect of its operations. These range from standardized applications suchas group discussion databases and document libraries to custom-developedapplications covering complex business processes such as change management,quality control and technical specifications. For competitive reasons, DaimlerChrysler generally refrains from discussingspecific processes and return on investment figures, but executives reportthat many of the applications are "intensively used and a huge success."40,000users -- 40,000 applications.  The ROI of being able to deploy oneproduct to tackle messaging, sharing, and workflow is clearly how DaimlerChryslerbenefits from Notes/Domino today. Link: ibm.com:A standardized, global system for communication and collaboration helpsDaimlerChrysler compete >

November 23, 2005 by

Real Estate Investor Calculator Pro

The Real Estate Investor Calculator Pro is a personal real estate assistant, which provides the investor with a simple way to calculate...

August 18, 2009 by RealtyInvestorSoft

Calculating ROI

ROI, or Return On Investment, is an analysis tool used to calculate a project's expected benefit in light of its costs. But it's more complicated than you may think. Learn what it is, when to use it, and how to calculate ROI.

July 21, 2005 by

ROI? Who cares?

When I research and write enterprise IP-telephony technology deployment pieces, one of the main questions I ask the company or organization that acquired the solution is: "where's the ROI?"Return-On-Investment is, of course, a quality metric.

March 23, 2005 by

Horizon Investment Analyst

Horizon Investment Portfolio Analyst is an Investment Portfolio Manager for Windows. It calculates profit, periodic total return, cumulative...

April 11, 2009 by Horizon Software

Aussie enterprises struggling with business integration projects

Fifty one percent of business integration projects in Australian organisations were not delivered on time last year, according to a survey by InterSystems Corporation.Despite Australian organisations allocating 20 percent of their IT budgets to business integration projects, the survey said 46 percent had not or were not expected to deliver the targeted return on investment (ROI).

March 14, 2005 by

Get a return on your security investment

The notion that security solutions don't deliver return on investment is hogwash, says Hurwitz. Sure, security is about protecting assets, but firewalls and intrusion detection systems can still deliver ROI.

August 27, 2002 by

Survey: Portal spending set to soar

Sales of enterprise portals is set to reach $4bn by 2005, but firms may need to rethink how they measure returns on investment Analyst firm Butler Group has forecast that sales of enterprise portal products will grow dramatically, reaching $4bn worldwide by 2005. But it added that companies may need to change the way they measure return on investment (ROI) when judging the value of technology such as portals.

November 25, 2001 by

Survey: UK firms don't check ROI on Web investments

A third of firms are failing to measure the return on investment (ROI) of their Web developments, fueling fears of wasted IT spending.Despite growing boardroom pressure on IT departments to justify expenditure, 33 percent of firms have not measured the success of their Web strategies, according to a survey of Web strategy leaders in 120 UK organizations with an annual turnover of more than £100m.

October 28, 2001 by

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