Roi+strategy+skills

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Tech body hunts for head

A quango charged with allocating funding for innovative technologies has advertised for a new chief.The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) advertised for a chair for the Technology Strategy Board (TSB) on Tuesday.

March 9, 2011 by

AMD recaps 2008 green and sustainability initiatives

For those of you who are beginning to account for sustainability strategy in your IT purchasing habits, Advanced Micro Devices has just published its two annual proclamations about its green and corporate responsibility efforts. Among the programs/milestones you can read about:The AMD Changing the Game initiative, which is focused on encouraging the development of video games that impart social issues and values, and promote math, science and technology skills.

August 28, 2009 by

CIO strategic competencies for 2009

The Center for CIO Leadership has released research measuring CIO skills in four areas linked to enterprise success: leadership; business strategy and process; innovation and growth; and organization and talent management. This study does an important job highlighting CIO progress while highlighting areas where improvements are needed.

December 22, 2008 by

Becta has a lot to learn

Rather than beating Microsoft with a legislative stick, cutting it down to size by giving schools the skills to consider alternatives is a much smarter strategy

October 22, 2007

SAP and ERP are Dead??

Not according to research described in CIO Insight:“Right now, anybody who is working in the SAP world, either with functional or technical skills, is doing great,” said Jim Lanzalotto, vice president of strategy and marketing for Yoh, a recruiting and outsourcing firm, based in Philadelphia. “The demands are for specialized skills, and if you’ve got to pick the right market to be a specialist in, the world of SAP is hot.

July 25, 2007 by

Hidden meanings in NSW's 'People First'

While some states boast about procurement plans and how much they'll boost industry coffers, the NSW government appears to be heading in the opposite direction.At a media briefing last week, the NSW Minister for Commerce John Della Bosca and NSW government CIO Paul Edgecumbe unveiled a seemingly complex strategy for how they'll gain better ROI from the state's IT infrastructure over the next four years.

August 1, 2006 by

Strategy skills needed as CIO role evolves

Australian information technology (IT) managers will struggle to become good chief information officers (CIO) unless they learn the skills to manage the role's increasingly strategic influence on business, according to former Telstra manager-turned-academic, Professor Steve Burdon.

February 6, 2006 by

Best journalist question of the day

I've been hiding in meeting rooms muchof yesterday and today, talking with the press about this week's announcementsand the state of the market.  Yesterday afternoon, I met with threeJapanese journalists for what was one of the best interviews I've donein a long time.These guys were prepared!  Theyhad excellent questions which reflected the Japanese cultural tendencyto think long-term and in multiple directions.  I don't speak Japanese,but I know a few of the key phrases and intonations of the language.  Combinethat with the "Engrish" (romanji character) pronunciation ofmany of the technical words, and I was able to understand most of the questionseven before they had been translated.  The eye contact was intense,the laughter reflected in the creases in the corner of the eye, and itall worked despite my constant reminder to myself to say "hai"at appropriate points and never to use the word "no".So what was the question worth blogging? It was, essentially -- four years ago, you announced a J2EE-basedcollaboration strategy.  It was a two-lane highway.  Today wehear a lot of news about ongoing investment and enhancement in the coreNotes/Domino technologies, and no two-lane highway.  What has changedand why?I love this question (and I told theJapanese that I do).  The question is asked at user groups, by journalists,by CIOs.  It requires a philosophical answer, but is one that I getasked enough that I've honed the philosophy.When Al Zollar stood on that stage fouryears ago and announced collaboration for J2EE, a number of things drovethe decision.  The primary two still make perfect sense today.  1) Software is becoming componentized.  You can see it in the way IBM and others build solutions today.The new Sametime uses an Eclipse framework, a Codec from someone else,etc.  Making components to provide collaborative capabilities is agood idea.  2) J2EE, or alternatively .NET, havebecome the primary languages for application developers.  The forecastin 2002 was that by 2005, 80% of all new apps would be written in one orthe other.  I don't think it happened that way -- for a variety ofreasons, I think the number is lower.  But it is still a fact thata new computer science graduate from unversity is more likely to be focusedon Java or .NET than anything else.  And convincing them learn todevelop in Domino Designer is a challenge, because it's "proprietary"to one (albeit incredibly popular) platform.So we had to start getting behind oneof these development platforms, and as IBM, it makes sense that we choseJava.  The Workplace Collaboration Services, and many of the Workplace-brandedproducts, reflect this.  But a funny thing happened on the way toJ2EE-based collaboration -- market adoption of Notes/Domino continued,and more importantly, existing customers grew their Domino investmentsthrough larger user populations and increasing numbers of applications.The problem with the "two-lanehighway" was that there was an implication you would eventually haveto move to the other lane, and it would take some superhuman feat to doso.  There's no ROI in migration, and IBM -- unlike our primary competitor-- just don't believe in it.  So instead of following separate andparallel development paths, we started finding ways to integrate the new,Java-based, componentized technologies with the existing Notes/Domino products.This results in several things you saw/heardyesterday -- at the client side, Notes integrates with the Workplace ManagedClient as a plug-in.  The next version of Domino will integrate portaltechnologies into the server.  They are still Notes and Domino-- running every Notes application that you do today, with no architecturalchanges required.  But now we integrate the Activities model intoNotes; we integrate the components into Notes (Sametime 7.5 will providethe IM plug-in for Notes "Hannover").  It becomes the bestof all worlds -- continuing investment and innovation for the productsin use by 61,000 customers today, while adopting for the "nextgen"of Java-based programming.  Tools like IBM Workplace Designer helpbridge the two, by providing a Java-based development tool that works likeDomino Designer.  In a future version, it will even build rich clientapplications.I have been at Lotus through this entiretransition and journey.  And when I see what the development teamhas done to leverage our strengths and heritage, combined with toolingfor the future, it makes me incredibly proud to be a part of all of this. We're doing what's right for customers, not just what's convenientfor us (whehter that be a 64-bit migration or an obsolesence of existingproduct APIs).  It takes more work, but the best and the brightestare making it happen.  And the best part is, it has made Notes evenmore powerful, and more useful, for the next sixteen years of its lifecycle.

January 24, 2006 by

It's a long, hard road to homeland security

The proposed Department of Homeland Security is a daunting project. Its success will demand the tools and skills to compete with tech-savvy terrorists, a global IT strategy and top-notch executive leadership.

June 13, 2002 by

It's a long, hard road to homeland security

The proposed Department of Homeland Security is a daunting project. Its success will demand tools and skills to compete with tech-savvy terrorists, a global IT strategy, and top-notch executive leadership.

June 10, 2002 by

SALT Forum speaks louder

Brooktrout Technology has joined the SALT Forum, a group of companies spearheading the use of speech technologies. The forum, composed of 19 companies including Cisco and Intel, is working to develop the Speech Application Language Tags (SALT) specification, which supports text-to-speech and related functions for multiple devices, such as telephones, wireless handhelds or cellular phones. The Microsoft-backed SALT strategy competes on some levels with speech technology from IBM. Brooktrout, which makes hardware and software for communications networks, said it will contribute its skills in media processing for IP (Internet Protocol) networks and help the SALT specification meet carriers' requirements. --Tiffany Kary

May 8, 2002 by

Survey: UK firms don't check ROI on Web investments

A third of firms are failing to measure the return on investment (ROI) of their Web developments, fueling fears of wasted IT spending.Despite growing boardroom pressure on IT departments to justify expenditure, 33 percent of firms have not measured the success of their Web strategies, according to a survey of Web strategy leaders in 120 UK organizations with an annual turnover of more than £100m.

October 28, 2001 by

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