Servers+tools

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PicApport

PicApport is an easy-to-use, free of charge, photo server for your home network. Watch your photos on any device connected to your...

November 26, 2014 by Contecon

Sponsored by Redhat and Intel

Driving Innovation with IaaS

Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) is a model where servers and other resources are provisioned as required over the cloud. This model provides self-service, on-demand access to IT resources, which means users can create and access tools they need within minutes, instead of days, weeks or months.

November 5, 2014 by

Five out of six developers now using or deploying open source

Five out of six developers recently surveyed by Forrester Research say they have used or are using open source tools as part of their application development or deployment and the top five classes of software used are operating systems, web servers, databases, developer tools and configuration management tools

December 7, 2012 by

dbForge SQL Complete

dbForge SQL Complete is a useful add-in for SQL Server Management Studio and Visual Studio. Free and paid editions of the tool offer...

November 19, 2014 by Devart

CoyotePoint EQ/OS 10 a new foundation

Coyote Point decided that their application delivery servers needed a better foundation to improve connectivity, security, management tools, acceleration and availability. Future products will be based upon EQ/OS 10.

November 20, 2011 by

MarkLogic - Unstructured Data Supertanker

MarkLogic are an interesting and rapidly growing company in the enterprise space right now:  essentially they replace the relational database model in ways that make their next generation purpose built tools fit your unstructured data.Their servers coral all the heterogeneous information companies create to index everything they see, pulling together information in context.

March 15, 2011

dbForge Studio for SQL Server

dbForge Studio for SQL Server is an integrated environment for SQL Server development, management, administration, data reporting and...

November 10, 2014 by Devart

Novell launches updated PlateSpin products

I've been tracking PlateSpin (now part of Novell) for quite some time. The company has offered a number of innovative management tools for virtual and physical environments and continues to impress me with its approach to managing a diverse environment containing both physical and virtual servers.

June 13, 2010 by

Oracle to Buy Sun - View from the Virtual World

If Oracle's acquisition of Sun actually becomes a market reality, it will most certainly change the dynamics of the market for servers, operating systems, development tools, database management systems, applications and, of course, virtualization technology. Let's take a dark view of the possibilities in each area.

April 20, 2009 by

Bluestripe to tackle application management in virtual environments

Today marks the launch of Bluestripe, a Research Triangle Park, NC startup focused on application service management in virtualized data centers.The founders, former execs from Wily and IBM/Tivoli, maintain that most virtual servers deployed today support “non critical” applications such as file and print servers because there are no tools available today to manage transactional applications deployed across multiple tiers.

September 7, 2008 by

Splunk adds change-management and Windows support to IT search software

IT search company Splunk today added to its arsenal of tools for IT managers with the launch of Splunk for Change Management, an application to audit and detect configuration and changes, and Splunk for Windows, which indexes all data generated by Windows servers and applications.The San Francisco company provides a platform for large-scale, high-speed indexing and search technology geared toward IT infrastructures.

April 29, 2008 by

Marc Andreesen digs into the Platform

As Danny highlights in the latest instalment of This Week's Semantic Web, Marc Andreessen has once more demonstrated that he's not content with co-authoring Mosaic, sneaking around in the 24 Hour Laundry and driving social networking Ning-style. Far from it, as he continues his recent practice of blogging thoughtfully on issues facing the industry of which we - and he - are part. Yesterday's post, The three kinds of platforms you meet on the Internet, touched on a number of issues that we've addressed here on Nodalities before, and it is well worth both reading and thinking about.As Marc suggests in his introduction; “One of the hottest of hot topics these days is the topic of Internet platforms, or platforms on the Internet. Web services APIs (application programming interfaces), web services protocols like REST and SOAP, the new Facebook platform, Amazon's web services efforts including EC2 and S3, lots of new startups talking platform (including my own company, Ning)... well, 'platform' is turning into a central theme of our industry and one that a lot of people want to think about and talk about. However, the concept of 'platform' is also the focus of a swirling vortex of confusion -- lots of platform-related concepts, many of them highly technical, bleeding together; lots of people harboring various incompatible mental images of what's about to happen in our industry as a consequence of various platforms. I think this confusion is due in part to the term 'platform' being overloaded and being used to mean many different things, and in part because there truly are a lot of moving parts at play that intersect in fascinating but complex ways.”How true. The Platform space is a great one to be in and it's brimming over with opportunity and potential; so much so that we're one company staking an awful lot upon the detail of our Platform vision. Traditionally sloppy use of language, however, has led to a situation in which unnecessary confusion is now associated with a superficially straightforward term. Some of this confusion is introduced by innocent drift in the evolving usage of a word, but far more is down to the unfortunate fashion for everyone jumping on the bandwaggon and unleashing a 'platform' of their own. At least we've been using the Platform label for our own endeavours in this area for a number of years.In his attempt to introduce some clarity, Marc's post reiterates his basic definition of an internet platform; “A 'platform' is a system that can be programmed and therefore customized by outside developers -- users -- and in that way, adapted to countless needs and niches that the platform's original developers could not have possibly contemplated, much less had time to accommodate. We have a long and proud history of this concept and this definition in the computer industry stretching all the way back to the 1950's and the original mainframe operating systems, continuing through the personal computer age and now into the Internet era. In the computer industry, this concept of platform is completely settled and widely embraced, and still holds going forward. The key term in the definition of platform is 'programmed'. If you can program it, then it's a platform. If you can't, then it's not.”Check.He then offers three 'kinds' or 'levels' of Internet platform, being careful to stress that one is not necessarily better than those it supersedes; “I call these Internet platform models 'levels', because as you go from Level 1 to Level 2 to Level 3, as I will explain, each kind of platform is harder to build, but much better for the developer. Further, as I will also explain, each level typically supersets the levels below. As I describe these three levels of Internet platform, I will walk through the pros and cons of each level as I see them. But let me say up front -- they're all good. In no way to I intend to cast aspersions on what anyone I discuss is doing. Having a platform is always better than not having a platform, period. Platforms are good, period.”Marc's three levels are;Access API “Architecturally, the key thing to understand about this kind of platform is that the developer's application code lives outside the platform -- the code executes somewhere else, on a server elsewhere on the Internet that is provided by the developer. The application calls the web services API over the Internet to access data and services provided by the platform -- by the core system -- and then the application does its thing, on its own.”Plug-in APISuperficially very similar to the 'Access API', but the host application (such as Facebook) into which a developer's application connects does the vast majority of the work around marketing; “Facebook provides a whole series of mechanisms by which Facebook users are exposed to third-party apps automatically, just by using Facebook.”Runtime Environment “In a Level 3 platform [such as Salesforce], the huge difference is that the third-party application code actually runs inside the platform -- developer code is uploaded and runs online, inside the core system. For this reason, in casual conversation I refer to Level 3 platforms as 'online platforms'.” “Put in plain English? A Level 3 platform's developers upload their code into the platform itself, which is where that code runs. As a developer on a Level 3 platform, you don't need your own servers, your own storage, your own database, your own bandwidth, nothing... in fact, often, all you will really need is a browser. The platform itself handles everything required to run your application on your behalf.”And there's more, and it's interesting stuff that Marc has clearly thought about long and hard.Reading - and rereading - Marc's post, though, I kept coming back to ideas touched upon in two posts of mine about the relative openness of different Platform solutions; “Facebook and Talis might very well be offering 'Platforms', but they're quite different in intention. Facebook's platform seems to be all about making the Facebook site as rich, compelling and sticky as possible; everything is sucked to one point. The Talis Platform, on the other hand, is about providing developers - wherever they are - with the tools and capabilities to easily link and manipulate data across and through the web. The former sits heavily 'on' the web, and feeds upon it to suck ever more into its maw. The latter is truly 'of' the web, giving a distributed community of developers and users powerful new capabilities to enmesh their applications, and to deliver capabilities at the point of need.”Regardless of its position in Marc's levels, I truly hope and believe that the Internet platforms of long-term viability will be those that embrace the Network rather than feeding rapaciously upon it; those that are of the web as we are trying so hard to be.A Platform should give the developer a helping hand. It should lift them up and provide them with a set of tools that make it easier to concentrate upon and deliver their core value whilst the Platform worries about the day-to-day mundanity that is mere context [to paraphrase Geoffrey Moore]. A Platform should enable the developer to realise the benefit of those tools and capabilities in places and manners of their own choosing, rather than expecting or requiring the developer merely to expose their assets within the bounds of whatever site(s) the Platform chooses to offer. Platform providers who realise and embrace that will be the ones to succeed.

November 1, 2007 by

Groovy 1.0 is out

Groovy is a dynamic language that integrates seamlessly with the Java platform. It offers a syntax that mixes ideas from Java, Smalltalk, Python and Ruby, and lets your reuse all your Java libraries and protect the investment you made in Java skills, tools or application servers. Version 1.0 was released this week.

January 3, 2007 by

esxMigrator

Easy to use and efficient with time, esxMigrator is an excellent tool that will help busy server administrators upgrading from VMware’s ESX 2.x to VI3 server virtualisation.

November 7, 2006 by

100 percent uptime

Just finished a very good Notes/Dominobriefing with a customer here in the UK.  Their messaging profile:25,000 Notes users2 iSeries servers -- 12 partitions100% uptime -- since deployingiSeries servers two years agoAlot of the discussion revolved around where productivity is going.... ise-mail dead?  We talked about instant messaging, activites, sharedrepositories, and a lot of other collaboration tools.  It was interestinghow consistent the experience of the IBMers here in the UK is with my own-- "voice mail is dead" said the IBMer running the meeting.  That'scertainly true for me -- I get around to listening to business voicemailonce a week, at best.  Sametime is where it is at.Good meeting, and worth checking out this fascinating IBMbuilding in Hursley.

February 13, 2006 by

ZyXEL ZyWALL 35 UTM

The ZyWALL 35 UTM appliance combines all the basic security tools required to protect a small business network, and deploys them at the Internet gateway where they are most useful. Professional help with deployment may be required, however, and it doesn’t do away entirely with the need for desktop and server-side protection.

November 24, 2005 by

Altiris

Altiris was founded in 1998 to develop tools that reduce the cost and complexity of managing the IT lifecycle.Today, the US-based company provides software that enables IT departments to easily manage, secure and service hardware such as servers, desktops, notebooks and handhelds, as well as software which include Windows, Linux and UNIX platforms.

October 27, 2005 by

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