Students+pc+london

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Lenovo talks ThinkPads and servers

Lenovo is now the number-two PC vendor worldwide and has just posted record results for the 2011/12 financial year ending 31 March. Little wonder, then, that Dilip Bhatia, vice president and general manager of the company's ThinkPad Business Unit, was in bullish mood when I met him this morning in London (not even a two-hour cab ride from Heathrow managed to dent his enthusiasm).

May 24, 2012

Jam tomorrow: Dell unwraps its Christmas offerings

Dell showed off a raft of new products in London yesterday, including the Inspiron Duo netbook/tablet, an all-in-one touch screen PC, an M101z netbook, and the latest Dell Streak mobile phone. One of Dell's staff also had a Venue Pro running Windows Phone 7.

November 23, 2010 by

The more things change

134 students, 83 smart phones, 8 laptops - 3 of them macs. Sorry guys, but the PC just isn't cool anymore. It's back to the future: the 1980s in this case, this time with different bad guys and better answers.

October 15, 2010 by

Microsoft MultiPoint Server 2010

All over the world, schools are facing the same challenge: bringing ICT to students in a cost-effective way. "Each student should have their own laptop/netbook/PC," echoes the mantra, and school budgets groan trying to make ends meet. Microsoft MultiPoint Server 2010 seeks to solve the problem.

September 5, 2010 by

Microsoft further expands its Multipoint brand with new collaboration tools

Microsoft has updated the software development kit (SDK) for MultiPoint Mouse, a technology for creating applications that allow multiple students use their own mice to interact on the same PC. Meanwhile, Microsoft has fielded a public beta of Mouse Mischief, a Microsoft application for building PowerPoint apps that builds on top of the SDK.

January 14, 2010 by

Gallery: PC gems from the 1980s

The National Museum of Computing's PC Gallery in London recently opened and Nick Heath of sister site Silicon.com was on scene to relay the evolution of the computer.

May 12, 2009 by

Student bloggers open transparency to Imperial

Students from a wide variety of subjects and cultures have enabled Imperial College London to break down the barriers of insular university life to the wider public and prospective students, in form of a series of regularly updated blogs hosted on the site.From masters students to international and home students and more degrees you can shake a stick at, the ten student bloggers were recruited during freshers' week at the start of this academic year.

April 7, 2009 by

30 Days with the Acer Aspire One

Acer sent me a slick blue Acer Aspire One to test as part of their educational seed program on Friday. I have it for 30 days to put through its paces as a companion PC for me, as well as a possible 1:1 solution with a variety of students.

December 28, 2008 by

Look who’s buying Vista Home Basic (hint: it’s not home users)

Who’s buying new PCs with Windows Vista Home Basic? Judging by the name, you’d assume those OS editions would be loaded on underpowered machines for starving students and penny-pinching families. But you’d be wrong. Based on my observations of the PC market over the past year or two, I think consumers have rejected Home Basic in favor of Home Premium. But small, budget-conscious businesses have embraced the low-end OS. In one large sample I looked at, nearly three out of every five machines destined for small business included Windows Vista Home Basic. Small-business buyers are apparently able to look past that name, and PC makers are happy to accommodate them. I've got the details on this apparent trend.

October 9, 2008 by

New touch screen Classmates unveiled today

Intel unveiled a new iteration of its Classmate PC today, featuring a touch screen with tablet mode, a new wedge design, and motion-sensing internal hardware. According to Intel's press release,“Our ethnographic research has shown us that students responded well to tablet and touch screen technology,” Ibrahim added.

August 20, 2008 by

Labor to miss schools broadband plan deadline

The Liberals have accused the Labor government of "breaking another election promise" after Senator Kim Carr was unable to confirm that high-speed broadband access will be made available to schools in time to accompany government's planned one-PC-per-desk rollout for high school students.

March 19, 2008 by

Virtual labs and education

Yesterday, I asked for people to share their thoughts via a guest blog on virtualization in Ed Tech.   Guest blogger Erik Josowitz provided us with the following (thanks, Erik).  Feel free to talk back or submit your own guest blog with some specific experiences or implementation details. Virtualization is great tool but, like any Swiss-Army knife, success with it depends on the task at hand. One of the places that people get into trouble with virtualization is when they try to use out-of-the-box virtual infrastructure with non-technical audiences. Virtualization is a great solution but often is not a complete solution.In education we've frequently seen challenges that look like appropriate places to implement a virtualization solution, only to find that the end-result is not fully usable by the intended audience. One example is providing hands-on lab environments to support application training. Success in the workforce today depends on high-level application skills and there is no better way for students to attain those skills than through hands-on use of the software applications. Many educational institutions provide computer lab environments to help support their student population and provide access to necessary software applications. Many of these lab environments have become the source of IT management problems as they become virus-ridden, get subverted as distribution sites for pirated software or music, or just plain have the normal IT management issues associated with a shared resource in a public environment. For many institutions their student population brings with them their own PCs which solves one problem but creates another. The lab issues diminish but the problems of providing secure access to software (and software licenses) often takes its place.The answer, we've found, is virtual lab management - using virtualization to deliver secure computing environments as a shared resource. Virtual labs allow administrators to serve up a clean and unchangeable environment for each student - in the lab or on their own PC - on-demand. This makes it easy to provide access to applications that students either can't afford individually or that their home PCs cannot support. It makes it simple to track and monitor lab usage and to control the use of resources so that systems are not subverted into file servers. Virtual lab management sits on top of virtualization (from Microsoft or VMware) and tells it what to deliver and to who. It makes it easy for non-technical users to select the types of applications they need from a menu and to gain access to those environments without needing to understand virtualization, networking, hosts systems or anything about how it gets delivered. Best of all, virtual labs make it easy to manage capacity. By scheduling time in the lab environment the shared resource is managed for maximum utilization. If more capacity is needed it is simple to add additional resources to the system. The end-users simply see an increase in availability.Virtualization may not be a panacea for educational institutions, but for a subset of problems, a centralized virtual lab may enable technology administrators to focus their time and attention on enabling learning rather than administering systems.

December 19, 2007 by

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