Uc+data

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Nokia working to reduce traffic congestion

I had a nice chat with Ross Lamont from Nokia this morning regarding the Nokia Legends campaign (my interview should be in the next MobileTechRoundup podcast) and he mentioned that their Mobile Millenium project talked about on the Nokia Telegraph "virtual paper" was moving forward with a larger scale testing program. Nokia issued a press release announcing the launch of the pilot program that will collect and study traffic data received from GPS-enable mobile phones, particularly the N95, E71, and N96. Nokia Research Center is working with UC Berkeley and NAVTEQ on this project.

November 11, 2008 by

Evanescent lasers to speed up data transmission

It is refreshing to note that some scientists also have a solid literary culture. Researchers at UC Santa Barbara (UCSB) have built the world's first mode-locked silicon evanescent laser. But what is an 'evanescent' laser? It is a step toward 'combining lasers and other key optical components with the existing electronic capabilities in silicon.' In other words, this research work will provide a way to integrate optical and electronic functions on a single chip. As these evanescent lasers can produce stable short pulses of laser light, they will be useful for many optical applications, such as high-speed data transmission or highly accurate optical clocks.

August 22, 2007 by

UC medical school reports data breach

In the latest of a series of data breaches at universities, the University of California at San Francisco says there was a breach at its medical campus, reports CNET News. The breach may have compromised personal information of 46,000 campus and medical center faculty, staff and students.

April 9, 2007 by

A 50-terabyte database of brain maps

If you want to compare images from human brains with the ones of monkeys, dogs, cats, mice or birds, you should visit the BrainMaps.org website at UC Davis. It contains over 50 terabytes of brain image data directly available online. The researchers have found a way to transform sections of brain mounted on microscope slides into brain maps with a resolution of half a micrometer per pixel, or 55,000 dots per inch. With such a resolution, all the images are fully zoomable. You start with a single section of a brain and you explore it like if you had a virtual microscope. And the site also provides free downloadable tools to see the images in 3-D. Be warned: you might spend lots of time exploring this site.

February 28, 2007 by

Are you better than Berkeley?

If you graduated from Berkeley, some identity data about you is now likely in the wrong hands. According to a UC Berkeley press release, someone stole a laptop from the Graduate Division offices that contained information on people who applied to grad school from 2001 to 2004, registered as grad students from 1998 through 2003, received doctoral degrees from 1976 through 1999, and some others.

March 29, 2005 by

Are you better than Berkeley?

If you graduated from Berkeley, some identity data about you is now likely in the wrong hands. According to a UC Berkeley press release, someone stole a laptop from the Graduate Division offices that contained information on people who applied to grad school from 2001 to 2004, registered as grad students from 1998 through 2003, received doctoral degrees from 1976 through 1999, and some others.

March 29, 2005 by

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