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Prager University

The Official Prager University Mobile app allows mobile access to all Prager University video courses. Prager University courses are...

November 30, 2014 by Inish

Information system jobs go commodity, says report

People with information systems related majors had unemployment of 14.7 percent. You'd do better as a film, video and photography arts major, according to a Georgetown University report.

June 3, 2013

Elite Audio Recording Course Free

UNIVERSAL AUDIO RECORDING COURSE This free app contains the first 7 videos of the Elite Audio Recording Course app. Ever wanted to...

January 21, 2014 by Shane Wellman

Mob rules: Aussies revamp surveillance

A company formed using government and university funds has begun to commercialise a video technology that learns to recognise unusual behaviour from moving video footage, such as someone falling down the stairs at a train station.

April 19, 2010 by

Video: Eric Schmidt's commencement address at Penn

Google Chairman and CEO Eric Schmidt was the guest speaker at University of Pennsylvania's 253rd Commencement address at Franklin Field on Monday, May 18, 2009.A video of his speech is available here (start at 1:48:40) -- although you'll need RealPlayer installed on your Mac to watch it.

May 19, 2009 by

60 Minutes: Decoding language of the brain [video]

In the emerging technology diversion department, here's a cool video from 60 Minutes. Andrew Schwartz, a neuroscientist at the University of Pittsburg, has implanted a grid of electrodes inside a monkey's brain in order to listen to the different brain cells (or neurons) in an attempt to decode the language of the brain.

November 3, 2008 by

Japan is Web "Future-Ready." U.S. lags far behind.

Japan is the place to be if you’re looking for the bandwidth to tackle future technologies – things like HD video streaming, visual networking and large file-sharing, according to a study by researchers from the Said Business School at the University of Oxford and the University of Oviedo's Department of Applied Economics.The researchers looked at 42 countries to understand how prepared each nation was for future Web technologies.

September 12, 2008 by

The government has an "iPatriot Act" ready for Internet control

My video of Lawrence Lessig, a law professor at Stanford University talking about an "iPatriot Act" has received a lot of views thanks to a post on the top blog site Boing Boing. Lawrence Lessig on the coming "i-Patriot Act" - Boing BoingI've taken out an extract of the relevant part of the video, here is a 3 minute section: http://video.

August 7, 2008 by

Aussies cash out in YouTube buy

An online video start-up launched by three Australian entrepreneurs (including, apparently, an old acquaintance of mine from university) has been bought by Google subsidiary YouTube for a reported US$15 million.

July 30, 2008 by

Tech camp for kids

Some kids prefer video games and computer programming to sports and nature, and the ID Tech Camps were created with that set in mind. CNET's Kara Tsuboi drops in on a summer session at Stanford University to watch these future tech masterminds hard at work on their summer vacations.

July 9, 2008 by

Robots working 6,000 meters below sea level

MercoPress, a news agency based in Uruguay, reports that German engineers are using an aquatic robot able to work 6,000 meters below sea level. This remotely operated vehicle (ROV), dubbed Kiel-6000, is operated by the Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences from the University of Kiel. The robot weighs 3.5 tons on the ground and it is 3.5 meters long and 1.9 meter wide, with a height of 2.4 meters. With its video cameras, it can transmit images to a mother vessel via a 6.5 kilometer-long fiber glass cable. According to the project leader, Kiel-6000 'will have access to 95% of the entire world's sea beds.' But read more...

June 17, 2008 by

Pigeons are as clever as 3-year-old children

Japanese scientists from Keio University have found that pigeons have self-cognitive abilities higher than 3-year-old humans. They have 'trained pigeons to discriminate real-time self-image using mirrors as well as videotaped self-image, and proved that pigeons can recognize video images that reflect their movements as self-image.' Until recently, it was widely admitted that only humans and primates such as chimpanzees could recognize images of themselves. Now, researchers have found that dolphins or elephants also could do it. But these Japanese scientists have proven that pigeons also were able to do it -- and even discriminate paintings of Van Gogh from Chagall. But read more...

June 13, 2008 by

Survivor Buddy, a friendly robot rescuer

The St. Petersburg Times, Florida, reports that a well-known robot designer, Robin Murphy, a professor of computer science and engineering at the University of South Florida (USF), 'plans to add a heart to robot rescuers.' As says USF, the goal is to develop 'a robot that will be a companion to a person who may be trapped after a car crash or in building ruins following an earthquake, or someone pinned down by sniper fire.' As said Murphy, 'robots can provide not only a sense of being a 'buddy' by playing soothing music or providing other entertainment, the robot also can be the audio and video link between survivor and family.' Murphy will develop this robot with some money coming from Microsoft. But read more...

May 17, 2008 by

A new way to improve computer graphics

Computer scientists at the University of California in San Diego (UCSD) have developed a fog and smoke machine for computer graphics which dramatically cuts computing costs for generating bright images. They've used 'photon mapping' algorithms, a subset of the more computationally intensive ray tracing algorithms -- and with better results. This could lead to better computer graphics for movies and video games. Now, the researchers are adapting their algorithms to render other materials, such as skin, milk and plants which behave more or less like fog or smoke. But read more...

April 16, 2008 by

Turning any monitor in to a 3D VR display

After seeing the above video sent to me by Justin James, I only have one thing to say: Give Jonny his PhD!  Johnny Lee is a PhD student at Carnegie Mellon University who took a standard Nintendo Wii remote and turned a monitor in to something special.

January 24, 2008 by

A Nano Bowl trophy for the Super Bowl

In November 2007, the American Physical Society (APS) launched the Nano Bowl video contest. You have to make a video that demonstrates some aspect of physics in [American] football and send them your movie. The winner will receive the smallest trophy ever made and $1,000 in cash. This 'nanotrophy' has been created at Cornell University in the Cornell NanoScale Facility (CNF). It has been built 'around a silicon chip on which, like Russian nesting dolls, football fields nest inside one another, the largest about 12 millimeters long and the smallest only 2 microns long.' In case you're interested, you still can submit your video until February 3, 2008 (Super Bowl Sunday). But read more...

January 18, 2008 by

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