Sex Tech: Tumblr NSFW search exclusion, LinkedIn escort ban, Nintendo's "gay bug"

Sex Tech: Tumblr NSFW search exclusion, LinkedIn escort ban, Nintendo's "gay bug"

Summary: A collection of notable new sex and technology news items. Covers innovation, legal issues, IP, privacy, controversies, business and more.

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Tumblr built an empire that incorporated a sane porn policy, and Yahoo! isn't known for "getting it" with new properties; meanwhile LinkedIn decides to dump independent contractors whose jobs they simply don't like - escorts.

Inquiring minds want to know: How will Yahoo! ghettoize Tumblr's porn?

The Yahoo! board has agreed to buy Tumblr, whose desirable user base currently has the freedom to post non-commercial adult-themed content.

YAHOO TUMBLR

But Yahoo! is well-known for misunderstanding the user base of properties it acquires and ruining - then scrapping - once-active, and beloved properties.

Many are speculating as to what Yahoo! is going to do with Tumblr's currently successful, user-retaining NSFW content policy.

But if Flickr's rep with poorly policing 'art nudes' is any hint of Tumblr's fate, then we're likely to see lots of once-happy users forced into confusing self-rating protocols, having their accounts banned and years of content deleted with no recourse, and a new content policy practically written by trolls who want the easiest path to shut down people they don't like.

Get out the popcorn, and go back up your Tumblr.

Odd timing: Tumblr caught hiding search exclusion from its NSFW users

Prior to the Yahoo! sale, Tumblr appears to have been lying to its thousands of NSFW blog users. Even though users were shown an active interface to opt-in to search engine crawlers, any blog self-selected was secretly being blocked from search indexing.

Well-respected, decade-plus sex blogger Bacchus from Eros Blog discovered the issue just before the Yahoo! talks were announced, and attempted to find out what was going on.

Exasperated from getting no answers about the apparent bait-and-switch from Tumblr Bacchus wrote,

If you’ve got an adult blog on Tumblr, there’s a good chance Tumblr uses robots.txt to exclude the search engines from indexing it.

If you’ve got an adult Tumblr, go look at your own settings. Do you see that first checkbox, the one that says “allow search engines to index your blog”? That checkbox is a lie. It’s nicely checked, it’s not greyed out, but if your blog is flagged “adult” it’s a lie.

It would be very interesting to know when the adult search bait-and-switch was implemented in regard to Tumblr's price tag talks with Yahoo!

Nintendo: same-sex marriage is a "bug"

Techdirt writes,

Gamers playing Nintendo’s Tomodachi Collection: New Life noticed that this latest iteration of the game, which is very much like The Sims, had the option for the first time to have their male characters marry other male characters and raise children together.”

Nintendo responded by releasing a patch to fix the “bug”, which it says allows for “human relations that become strange.”

Despite legalities, LinkedIn bans escorts from social network

Even though escorting and sex work is legal in some U.S. states and jurisdictions as well as countries around the world, social site LinkedIn has suddenly banned escorts from using the site. Perhaps Yahoo! is in talks to buy them as well?

Mashable writes,

Linkedin updated its user agreement terms last Monday, adding to the section entitled “Don’t undertake the following,”

LinkedIn now includes this statement: Upload, post, email, InMail, transmit or otherwise make available or initiate any content that: Even if it is legal where you are located, create profiles or provide content that promotes escort services or prostitution.

LinkedIn cracking down on all things grown-up?

Not more than a week after launching a beta version of an app, LinkedIn is revoking its API access to social hook-up app “Bang With Professionals,” a site which aimed to connect potential bangers using LinkedIn’s professional network.

Determined to fight revenge porn

The Atlantic's title misleads – this is not actually a how-to on fighting back against revenge porn.

But it’s well worth reading: For those whose privately shared photos have made their way to the web, an argument of implied confidentiality may be a good bet.

Topics: Legal, Mobile OS, Japan, Social Enterprise

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