Six clicks: Can your browser do these tricks?

Six clicks: Can your browser do these tricks?

Summary: All web browsers are not created equal. Each of the top six browsers has a unique killer feature.

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TOPICS: Browser
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  • Google Chrome highlights noisy tabs

    It’s happened to everyone who’s ever used a web browser. You’re rolling along, with so many tabs open that they’ve begun scrolling off the screen, and suddenly an ad or video clip begins playing. Which tab is the annoying one? The only way to find out is to click and scroll and click and scroll.

    Until Chrome version 32 arrived on the scene, that is. Beginning with that release, every open web page currently making noise is identified by a small speaker icon on its tab, meaning you can find and silence the offender with a quick scan.

    This is one feature every browser should have, and probably will, someday. But for now it’s a Chrome exclusive.

  • Internet Explorer Tracking Protection Lists

    The ugly secret of the Web is that you’re being tracked just about everywhere you go by advertisers and analytics companies that scoop up your personal data and store it in giant databases outside your control. There are plenty of third-party add-ons that claim to protect your privacy, but only Internet Explorer (version 9 or later) has this capability built in.

    When you turn on Tracking Protection, you can use a list that Internet Explorer builds on the fly, as you use the browser. Or you can use a third-party list tailored to block specific domains known for their tracking behavior. Microsoft even created a list aimed at preventing Google from collecting data as you visit third-party sites.

    If you care about privacy, it’s a good tool to keep at your disposal.

  • Safari sharing

    Safari is, perhaps, the most boring of all browsers, not known for its innovative interface or cutting-edge features. But because mobile Safari is the only option on the wildly popular iPad, it’s insanely popular. And on both OS X and iOS it has one built-in feature that none of its rivals do.

    When you visit a web page in Safari, you can share it easily via Twitter or Facebook (or email) using the Share tool. This feature doesn’t require any third-party apps, and it lets you bypass annoying widgets that add extra information (including tracking codes) to your tweet or post. If you haven’t previously connected either service to your iPad, you’ll be prompted to do so the first time you use this feature. After that, it’s a simple matter of tap-and-share.

Topic: Browser

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  • All browsers should be silent by default

    If I explicitly play something it can speak otherwise it should be seen and not heard.
    greywolf7
    • computer should be seen not heard

      I don't have sound on except if I'm watching a Utube or something of the sort...................

      It's worth noting that "speed dial" is standard on Firefox............ Save a group of bookmarks in a folder on the bookmarks bar, right click, and they all open..........
      **owly**
      • or just

        double-click that folder or subfolder to open all bookmarks from that folder. You also can sellect the very last line after a regular click on a folder whitch reads: "Open all in tabs".
        Kualinar
      • Speed Dial was introduced in Opera 9.2,

        back in 2007...Firefox didn't have it natively (without an extension) until version 9 in about 2011...
        wizard57m-cnet
  • bastard browsers

    Browsers in general each have their strengths alas some just don't play nice or even worse refuse to let certain add ons install at all on competing browsers, looking at you Google chrome & adobe flash player, after uninstalling flash player from a windows 7 laptop consequently in trying to reinstall the only way to do so was to be forced to accept chrome as the default browser. How long are U going to wait Google to pull the same asshole stunt with you tube?
    yofuss
    • Incorrect

      You could choose from the very beginning of the Flash install to NOT install the Chrome browser. Adobe has, over the years, done the same thing with McAfee, Chrome and other software.
      benched42
  • Safari Sharing Isn't Alone...

    One may note that sharing with Windows 8.1 is not so far away too with just WIN + H (or the Share Charm). Then, you're done one just a click or two later.

    I also *love* IE11's reading view!
    deMaelstrom
    • Exactly...

      ...not to mention the same function exists on Windows Phone natively as well.
      GoodThings2Life
      • Android

        And pretty much any Android app or browser.
        hades_2100
  • Safari/iPad

    "But because mobile Safari is the only option on the wildly popular iPad..."

    Am I misunderstanding something? I use Chrome on my iPad regularly.
    WordsOfNothing
    • it's just a wrapper

      Not a real browser, just a wrapper for the Safari engine.
      Ed Bott
      • Then by that assessment, Opera [after version 12] should simply be called

        Chrome, because all it is a skin and a few extras thrown on Chrome. Also, it should be noted that on the new Opera, even those who like the skinning don't necessarily like the change in SpeedDial as now implemented.

        Nearly every browser has now copied SpeedDial as it used to be. The examples given above show only one standout, which is the feature of Chrome - and I don't use that browser, but it would be nice as a feature of every one.
        chrome_slinky
        • Opera 12 bookmarks disaster

          with the move to chromium engine, Opera lost the old bookmarks function and you can't sync your book marks from the Opera link server.
          really really annoying.
          Also the mish mash top/bottom controls is not design for thumb friendly use on tablets and phones. refresh is tiny in the top right and never on the bottom anymore.
          The tabbing feature on phones is slow and retarded.
          Opera 12 went backwards with the UI even though the rendering engine is slightly better.
          warboat
          • Hey warboat!

            Try going to just about any Google SSL site in a Presto based version of Opera...darned browser sniffing...I stuck with O 11.64 on my Slax and Win boxes, but just a couple of days ago Google started sending a page with only one line "This browser is not supported"...that's all! No link to alternatives, nada. Oh well. FTR, my fav of all-time regarding Opera was 9.64, followed by 5.12, then 3.52 (yep, from way back when you bought Opera!)
            wizard57m-cnet
      • Surpprising...

        I remain surprised by the amount of iOS users that really believe they use Chrome.

        Worse, they usually don't trust me when I tell them it's just a shell around Safari... until a rendering test proves the point. Deception following.
        TheCyberKnight
        • I've had iPad users

          tell me they've got Word and Excel on their iPads and then show me Pages and Numbers.
          warboat
          • This shows the power of branding

            Just like word 'Kleenex' stands for tissue, 'Word' stands for word processor.
            Users do not really care what it is, as long as it does what they expect from it.
            ForeverSPb
      • Fair enough, but...

        Even if other iPad browsers are just wrappers for the Safari engine, there is merit to multiple instances of the engine, since each can have its own settings and interface. Very handy for working with multiple Microsoft or Google accounts, for example. I routinely use Safari, iCab, and Opera on my iPhone.
        josehill
      • Seriously? That's the argument you're going for?

        It's only a real browser if it uses it's own rendering engine? So Chrome is never a real browser on any platform?
        baggins_z
        • What?

          Chrome uses its own rendering engine on just about every single OS out there. :|
          Michael Alan Goff