Solving my biggest MacBook Pro annoyance … for only $20

Solving my biggest MacBook Pro annoyance … for only $20

Summary: I've found a fix for my biggest MacBook Pro annoyance, and it didn't involve me using epoxy or getting the MIG welder out.

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TOPICS: Hardware
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I love my MacBook Pro. It's a fantastic workhorse, and handles 95 percent of what I want a computer to do. What took two or three systems a few years ago I can now do on one, which is doubly amazing consider that it's a portable.

But there's one aspect of the MacBook Pro that really annoys me, and that's how easily the MagSafe 2 connector detaches from the body. I know it's supposed to pop off to prevent me breaking the connector or dragging an expensive notebook to the floor when I'm in a careless mood, but this thing is far too sensitive. It pops off with the slightest touch of the cable. In fact, I'm sure it doesn't need a touch and that a hard stare will cause it to fall off.

Grrrrrrrr!

Fortunately, I've found a fix, and it didn't involve me using epoxy or getting the MIG welder out. And here it is. It's called a Snuglet.

Snuglet
(Source: Snuglet)

What is it? It's a precision-engineered metal ring that attaches to the MagSafe 2 connector that increases the strength of the magnetic connection while still allowing you to attach and detach the connector normally.

And the Snuglet doesn't just fit the MagSafe 2 connector, it fits it precisely, thanks to the fact that it has been machined to a tolerance of less than half the diameter of a human hair.

The cost? $20. Sure, I'm paying a third-party to solve Apple's engineering problems, but it's a small price to keep my MacBook Pro powered up reliably.

The Snuglet has been designed to work with all new Apple MacBooks that have the MagSafe 2 connector. These include ALL MacBook Air and MacBook Pro with Retina Display models purchased after June 2012.

Topic: Hardware

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35 comments
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  • Not sure I understand the problem, Adrian.

    I also have a MacBook that I've had for maybe 3 years, the the MagSafe connector works great. It takes a pretty good tug (or a trip over the cord) to get a disconnect. I'm not sure I have the MagSafe 2, which might be a newer, improved (???) version.
    Userama
    • er

      because if yours is 3 years old it will be magsafe 1.

      the article is about magsafe 2.

      Small point, but worth noting ;)
      Boothy_p
    • Same here

      whatever experiences people have had, Magsafe has worked on both my MacBooks (2009 and 2011 models.)
      HypnoToad72
      • The old magsafe is a COMPLETELY different animal...

        It would sit flush with the computer body and thus had much less leverage to "pop off". MS2 was in my opinion a serious step backward and falls off at the slightest movement.
        Playdrv4me
  • Re: Solving my biggest MacBook Pro annoyance....

    It would seem I am going to be the only one to post a sensible comment relating to this article.

    The Mag Safe was revolutionary and was yet another first from Apple. It should be noted a similar copied attempt was introduced on the Surface and Surface Pro.

    It is a wonder why more manufacturers do not implement similar as it would save a whole load of Laptops ending up on the deck.

    It is of no annoyance to me on my Retina MacBook Pro. more like piece of mind its not going to end up on the deck.
    5735guy
    • Revolutionary in what way?

      they've been using that same magnetic connector concept for years on things like deep fryers and other cooking utensils that involved the risk of scolding.

      What was revolutionary about it? the fact that they put it on a laptop?
      William.Farrel
      • BTW: The reason you don't see anyone else using it

        is because Apple has a patent on "Magnetic connector for electronic device"

        Imagine that, taking a pre-existing product used in cooking appliances and copying it to a laptop and getting a patent on all "electronic devices" (Radios, phones, TV, digital clocks, stereos, ect)

        Now that I agree with was "revolutionary"
        William.Farrel
  • Wow

    You must not throw much at it then! Oh wait, that's right, the GPU doesn't come into play much without many games.
    slickjim
    • How does the AMD Radeon HD 6750M fare?

      That slowly to you, perhaps?
      HypnoToad72
      • seriously?

        Way too slow! That's a card that is now 4 generations old or perhaps even older.

        7xxx cards barely run games anymore and when they do, AA has to be off and it certainly will not run the game above 720P without sips in frames.

        Also, Adobe products and even Python tools can now use the GPU but, the better they are, the faster they run.
        slickjim
  • Seriously you did not have to tell us about this

    This is something you could have kept in your mind instead of opening up your Content Management System. I guess you need to meet your quota for the month.
    adacosta38
  • I still don't see the attraction of the MacBook

    I recently purchased the MacBook Pro 13 and it spends all its time quietly charging on my counter. There is nothing magical or special about it. It does the same things my Windows laptops do. There are a few features that are nice additions. I like how the keyboard lights up as I get close to it. I like the application store, which Windows didn't have until recently. But really, it runs square applications with three buttons at the top, and a bar at the bottom. The animation transitions are more annoying that magical. The case looks very nice and feels great, but its also the same case they have had for five years now if only a little thinner.

    I don't think there is anything wrong with it, it runs well, its fairly speedy, it runs applications, but why settle for 95% of what you want when you can get a really good Windows laptop for 2/3 the price that does everything?
    A Gray
    • For a lot of people, it makes little difference whether they use

      Mac or Windows (or even Linux or Chrome or something else for that matter). A lot of the most used apps, such as Office, are available on both.

      After that, it comes down to whether or not a person needs specific apps that run only on one platform, and/or, individual preference.

      There is a lot of debate about whether or not Apple products are overpriced. Take the new Mac Pro as one example. Many state that they could make an equivalent PC at a cheaper price; however, if you check other sites you will find that some tech specialists maintain it would cost $2,000 more to build an equivalent PC and it still would not be Thunderbolt capable.

      Many on these fora have opinions. Few express INFORMED opinions! Others are simply trolls or shills trying to foment trouble. At the top of the list are idiots like Owl*Net, William.Farrell, and Loverock Davision.

      Enjoy whichever platform that you choose to use but also be prepared to understand its strengths but also its failings :-)
      1,2,3
      • No they don't...

        They try to rationalize it and say they cannot get the same parts so they get the next closest thing which is more powerful than the Mac Pro so they leave that off.
        slickjim
      • Yeah, an expensive convection oven that doubles as a pop can holster...

        Early reports show it idling at 62C, and approaching 100C under load.

        And it doesn't even use the Haswell chipset!

        Most technically-savvy people know that you want to keep temperatures lower than 75C under load. The actual number depends on the CPU model, but the hottest SAFE temperature is the important figure.

        Yes, the chip can technically run at 100C and power off at 105C, but lifespan will be reduced - 100C is not a safe temperature. And when the machine shuts off, so do the fans so residual heat will also adversely affect the processor... *sigh*
        HypnoToad72
      • One left foot calling me an idiot?

        Why, because I expose you as the ABMer troll you are, or because I only buy MS and Apple products, and don't love Google like you do, so who's the real idiot?

        The other two I can't speak for, but I'm guessing you get upset with me because I won't let you and your ilk come in here trying to hijack a blog with lies and FUD, which is the real reason you're here, I suspect.

        I agree, many on these forums have opinions. Few express INFORMED opinions! Others are simply trolls or shills trying to foment trouble. At the top of the list are idiots like Cloggedbottom7, One left foot, and SeanConnery007.

        I'm guessing that you flagged my other comment here because I mentioned why other electronics makers don't have a MagSafe type of connector on their electronics.
        William.Farrel
    • Design

      Until recently, the MacBook line was one of the few notebooks that actually had decent touch pads. Things have gotten better in the last 12 months on the Windows side, and for those who like full touch screens, Windows now also offers that. But for those who prefer a non-touch notebook, the Mac offers a more coherent experience than Windows 8.1.

      Regarding price, while there is still a Mac premium, I don't think it is 50% as you imply. Comparably equipped Ultrabooks from quality vendors like Samsung, Lenovo, and Acer are usually within $100-200 of Macs.
      KPOM1
      • Agree almost no Apple premium on MacBooks

        I have been shopping for a Windows or Mac machine, and machines with equivalent specs are right on top of each other pricewise. For the curious, the most comparable laptop Windows laptop I have found is a ThinkPad 440 and Samsung ATIV 9 series. I can run Microsoft office on either platform, so that's neutral, and the only downside to going to a Mac is having to leave Quicken for Windows for IBank.
        Luke Skywalker
        • Do you have an OEM or generic copy of Windows?

          If it's a generic copy of Windows 7 (or Vista) couldn't you dual boot on the Mac so that you could keep Quicken?
          William.Farrel
    • why is it assumed

      That for the author of 95% becomes 100%, when Windows gets involved?

      He never actually mentioned windows. He did in fact say that he used to need three computers to do all of the stuff, suggesting rather the opposite.

      My MacBook can do a number of things that a normal Windows laptop just doesn't do. foremost of these is run Xcode. Another thing that a MacBook can do, that I have never seen a Windows laptop do before, is run MIDI hardware with low latency and no pops, an absolute necessity for live music performance. My guess is that it Alienware laptop could probably do it as well, but I am not a PC gamer.

      I find it frustrating that people just don't seem to take people at their word, when they say that a MacBook Pro is a good laptop for them. It may not be for everyone, but why will people not accept the word of others when they say it is so for them?
      Mac_PC_FenceSitter