SQL Server 2012 gives UK clinicians self-service business intelligence

SQL Server 2012 gives UK clinicians self-service business intelligence

Summary: If we're able to get data analysis into the hands of clinical professionals, we open the door to very exciting avenues of on-demand data-based research.

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TOPICS: Health
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One of the more interesting aspects of my nursing clinical rotations in a wide array of settings was having the opportunity to use the different electronic charting systems in the various hospital groups. Since I came from a somewhat technical background, I found the ability to work with mobile charting a much more convenient way to organize information than the old paper methods.

But one of the things I also noticed was that the charting systems (and, pretty much all the clinical systems), were limited by the reporting and analytics tools that were baked in by programmers completely removed from the hospital environment.

If we wanted to see if there were trends in particular areas not designed into the pre-built reports, we were completely out of luck. Oh, sure. We could make a request to the IT department, and they'd probably (if they had time) turn in a feature request to the software maker. But you know as well as I do about the odds of getting a new feature back in anything resembling a timely manner.

That's why I'm very intrigued by the features described in the video below. According to UK clinical information systems company Ascribe, the new Microsoft SQL Server 2012, combined with SharePoint 2010, is giving them a way to provide medical professionals (administrative as well as clinical) with a way to customize their own reports, and develop their own drag-and-drop data analytics.

Here's where this is exciting. We often collect data, but we don't always know in advance how we want to look at it. Take, for example, a disease vector. Let's say we're trying to track down some new illness that we've never seen before. It's incredibly exciting to be able to go into the data we've already got, and explore and sift through it, looking for clues.

If we're able to get data analysis into the hands of clinical professionals, we open the door to very exciting avenues of on-demand data-based research.

Topic: Health

About

Denise Amrich is a Registered Nurse, the health care advisor for the U.S. Strategic Perspective Institute, and a mentor for the Virtual Campus at Florida's Brevard Community College.


Nothing in this article is meant to be a substitute for medical advice, and shouldn't be considered as such. If you are in need of medical help, please see your doctor.

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2 comments
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  • Is This Now An Advertising Blog?

    First you uncritically report on a glib conflation of counterfeit medicines with genuine, non-patent-licensed medicines, and the use of the former as a pretext for suppressing the latter. Now you uncritically report on a Microsoft product as though it is the only database and reporting tool around.

    Are you still speaking for users and patients? Because it seems you are very much speaking with a corporate voice now.
    ldo17
    • Hold it right there!

      ... how else are ZDNet staffers going to afford vacations in the Bahamas or Seychelles?!?

      Why do some folk gotta spoil all the fun? ... no fair!
      thx-1138_