SUSE to support SUSE Studio customized Linux distros

SUSE to support SUSE Studio customized Linux distros

Summary: SUSE Studio lets anyone quickly create their own customized Linux distribution and now SUSE is willing to give these distros commercial support.

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TOPICS: Linux, Open Source
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SUSE Studio is a great online program. It enables pretty much anyone create their own customized Linux distribution without being a Linux kernel engineer. But after you had built it, you were on your own... until now. Starting July 8th, SUSE will support your roll-your-own Linux if it's based on SUSE Linux.

suse_studio_flexible_deployment
SUSE Studio makes it easy to customize Linux.

For several years, SUSE Studio has enabled power-users to mix and match open-source programs and then bake them into their own distribution. For example, if you wanted a server using Nginx for its Web server with MariaDB for its backing database management system without any excess programs taking up room, you could have it.  

Once your special-blend Linux is ready to run, you can then deploy it in a variety of formats including CD, DVD and USB-drive images; virtualization images, or even deploy them directly to Microsoft's Azure cloud, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), and the SUSE Cloud.

Setting up was easy, but getting support was another question. SUSE  now provides an answer.

Andreas Jaeger, the SUSE Studio product manager, wrote, " If you run a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (or Desktop) image and have a valid subscription for it, we would support you under the same conditions as if you have installed the product directly from the installation media."

Jaeger continued, "For support purposes, additional packages might need to be installed to help with diagnosing and reporting. Also, if you replace software packages that are part of SUSE Linux Enterprise by others, than the replaced software and packages dependent on it cannot be supported."

So, how do you know what's supported and what isn't without needing to be a Linux designer?

Easy. "When you create a SUSE Linux-based distribution or application, SUSE Studio creates a 'Supportability Report' for each SUSE Linux Enterprise appliance. This report executes an automatic analysis of the generated appliance and uses heuristics to determine out what SUSE will support."

Generally speaking, if the packages you choose to use in your home-brew distro are supported in the underlying SUSE Linux Enterprise products, SUSE will support them.

I've long found SUSE Studio to be useful for quickly and easily building customized Linux distributions. Now, with paid technical support available for these operating systems, I can see SUSE Studio distributions gaining far more business customers.

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Topics: Linux, Open Source

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7 comments
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  • Well, Steven did it again

    The last article was a click bait, probably to get the hits up. This article, out for quite a while doesn't have a comment just yet. No wonder he has to write the click baits on Windows 8, when he writes a real article no one in the Open Source community cares.

    Let's see, about 3 more articles till the next click bait. It's a pattern Steven just can't break.
    Cynical99
    • Cynical99...your worthless post should get the clicks up.

      And what do you do in this world besides FLAP your gums here on Zdnet?
      Over and Out
      • Watch strange people

        like you surface and flap their gums without anything of value to say.
        Cynical99
    • Sweet!

      Minus -1

      So sweet you now have -5 , Steven thanks you.
      RickLively
      • That's OK, he doesn't read these anyway

        He finally figured out that he's cultivated a following of Linux fans that only fight and do nothing constructive. Word is that he gave up reading any posts because of the extreme fanboy posts from both sides.

        Of course, Steven cultivated that group of followers early in his career. Clear back in his CW days (before they canned him) his posts were so bizarre that, well, Joyce got involved and finally sent Steven packing.

        He now follows a fairly predictable pattern. Three to five decent articles that get few responses, perhaps one lucky article that gets a handful of responses, then a pure click bait article, usually based on claiming MS is dead, Windows is dead, or some other inane claim in the Windows area, then back to decent articles until he has that psychological need for a click bait.

        If you haven't identified that pattern, have a look. Fairly straight forward. His fans are more than happy to oblige him.
        Cynical99
  • Another effort from the Linux community...

    to fragment the Linux market even more. By 2020, we will have about 20.000 different Linux distributions, each one offering basically the same things with different colors and visual styles. Don't get me wrong, options are great, but too many options are confusing. What is the problem with the mainline distributions? Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Fedora, OpenSUSE... these are great. What's wrong with you people?
    leonsk29
    • How do you really feel about life?

      Hum,,,,,,,,,

      “Another effort from the Linux community...”
      “to fragment the Linux market even more. By 2020, we will have about 20.000 different Linux distributions, each one offering basically the same things with different colors and visual styles. Don't get me wrong, options are great, but too many options are confusing. What is the problem with the mainline distributions? Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Fedora, OpenSUSE... these are great. What's wrong with you people?”
      RickLively