Symform's revolutionary and free cloud backup (podcast)

Symform's revolutionary and free cloud backup (podcast)

Summary: Symform's Bytes or Bucks peer-to-peer cloud network allows you to backup anything and everything for the low cost of local storage. It's both brilliant and crazy.

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TOPICS: Cloud, Networking
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Symform1

Symform has brought crazy to a whole new level with their Bytes or Bucks cloud backup solution. Find out how you can join the world's largest peer-to-peer backup network at a fraction of the cost of conventional backup and disaster recovery solutions. In this 28 minute podcast, Symform's CTO and Co-founder, Bassam Tabbara and Director of Product Managment, Tim Helming explain how the system works, how they make money and how you can get started in as little as 15 minutes.

 

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Topics: Cloud, Networking

About

Kenneth 'Ken' Hess is a full-time Windows and Linux system administrator with 20 years of experience with Mac, Linux, UNIX, and Windows systems in large multi-data center environments.

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2 comments
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  • Not for me

    Sorry, but I don't think I'd like my data stored on someone else's personal system, no matter how secure they think it may be. No matter how secure the system, once physical access is allowed, you may as well consider the data compromised...
    Plenty
    • From the Symform website...

      “In order for a perpetrator to compromise just one block of data, they would need to be able to identify 64 of the 96 individual Symform devices across which the block’s fragments are spread, compromise those devices, extract the fragments, and reassemble them. They would then need to obtain the randomly generated 256-bit key by breaking into Symform’s Cloud Control. Just to reassemble one file, they would need to repeat this whole process for potentially hundreds of blocks.”
      Leif Espelund