Tech firms' donations favour NSW Libs

Tech firms' donations favour NSW Libs

Summary: Tech companies have overwhelmingly supported the New South Wales Liberal Party over the New South Wales Labor party in the last financial year, according to donation figures released by the Election Funding Authority (EFA) this week.

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Tech companies have overwhelmingly supported the New South Wales Liberal Party over the New South Wales Labor party in the last financial year, according to donation figures released by the Election Funding Authority (EFA) this week.

In the year that saw the long-running but deeply unpopular Labor government ousted from office in New South Wales, and replaced by the coalition, led by Premier Barry O'Farrell, the Liberal Party enjoyed the lion's share of political donations in the state, receiving a total $9,232,856.21 in the year ending 30 June 2011, compared to Labor's total donations of $3,760,765.36. The Nationals also took $2,311,510.58 in funding for the year.

The only noticeable donation from tech companies to Labor was from consulting firm Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, which donated $28,342.

The rest, according to the EFA, went to the Coalition.

CSC Australia was by far the biggest donor, with $15,827.27 provided over the last year. Optus was a close second, with $14,909.09. Macquarie Telecom donated $6000 in total, while Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu donated just over $10,000. Telstra was the lowest spender in 2010-11, coughing up $3218.18.

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu was also a big donor to the NSW Nationals, accounting for $21,100 in donations.

While donations for the coalition in New South Wales are up overall, spending by tech companies appears to be down. In 2009, Telstra spent $54,830 between both the Labor and Liberal parties, while Deloitte spent $104,891. Macquarie Telecom also spent $20,000 split between the two parties.

Information on other parties, such as The Greens, has yet to be published.

Topics: Government, Government AU, Outsourcing, Telcos, Optus, Telstra

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Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

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5 comments
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  • Dont know why they bother, the only thing that the Liberal Party wants is to dumb down technology to the point where they have total control of whatever defective system they approve of. The shame is the tag of Luddite which was once was applied to workers who didnt want technological progress because of reasonable fears that they may lose work in skilled occupations now applies to conservative politics who are starting to understand that technological advancement means that they are now starting to lose control of the people whom they have previously dumbed down due to the freedom of access to information that they were previously told by the conservatives was bad for their lives and occupations. It amazes me that IT companies would support these modern day luddites in favour of more enlightened organisations.
    BoomerMMW
    • And those more enlightened organisations would be?
      mwil19-a34f7
  • Perhaps it's because IT companies in some instances are still run by "old school" management, who traditionally have their roots in conservative politics?
    Beta-9f71a
  • I'm sure they'll get their monies worth...

    Personally, I think companies should be banned from "donating" to political parties, most of the issues in US politics/law are because of that.
    Tinman_au
  • Good call tinman. If politicians received no money from business, trade unions, overseas companies and the like, we might actually get to see good policy being made for the people, not interest groups.
    mwil19-a34f7