Tiny gigabit wireless chip nears completion

Tiny gigabit wireless chip nears completion

Summary: The prototype of a short-range gigabit wireless chip, which promises more than 2Gbps throughput speeds and costs just AU$10, will be unveiled by the end of this year, according to researchers from National ICT Australia (NICTA).At the organisations' annual Techfest, which was held in Melbourne on Monday, researchers said they were on track to unveil a prototype of the chip by the end of this year and estimated that a commercial product could be available in 2008.

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The prototype of a short-range gigabit wireless chip, which promises more than 2Gbps throughput speeds and costs just AU$10, will be unveiled by the end of this year, according to researchers from National ICT Australia (NICTA).

At the organisations' annual Techfest, which was held in Melbourne on Monday, researchers said they were on track to unveil a prototype of the chip by the end of this year and estimated that a commercial product could be available in 2008.

Tim Walsh, sensor networks software engineer at NICTA, told ZDNet Australia that the low-cost chip, which operates in the 60GHz band, is designed to create a wireless connection capable of transferring a full DVD movie in around one minute.

In this 1:15 video, Walsh explains that the tiny chip, which is 5mm x 5mm, will allow consumer electronic devices to communicate at high speed over distances of up to 10 metres.

"Currently, state of the art wireless networks operate at about 40Mbps to 500Mbps. We are targeting about five times that speed. It is a very, very fast version of Bluetooth," said Walsh.

NICTA is research institute that is partly funded by the government, which attempts to commercialise projects that have been designed by some of the best minds in Australian academia.

Munir Kotadia travelled to Melbourne as a guest of NICTA.

Eds note: Other NICTA video interviews include:

Topics: Networking, Government AU, Mobility

Munir Kotadia

About Munir Kotadia

Munir first became involved with online publishing in 1998 when he joined ZDNet UK and later moved into print publishing as Chief Reporter for IT Week, part of ZDNet UK, a weekly trade newspaper targeted at Enterprise IT managers. He later moved back into online publishing as Senior News Reporter for ZDNet UK.

Munir was recognised as Australia's Best Technology Columnist at the 5th Annual Sun Microsystems IT Journalism Awards 2007. In the previous year he was named Best News Journalist at the Consensus IT Writers Awards.

He no longer uses his Commodore 64.

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3 comments
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  • 10 Meters???

    I think an improvement on the 10 meter range would be good! What use is a 10m chip if a cable would do the same job, and not be prone to interference?
    anonymous
  • portable apps

    10 m isn't really that bad, placed in a pda/mobile/smartphone it would make it easy to communicate between several devices. Your Pda/laptop could stream audio/video to your phone as you go with out the need for a cable.

    It's a great idea and there's no doubt the futures looking good for wireless products
    anonymous
  • what's its task

    sometime cable might do the same jobs. But do you want on your own desk wires and cables are spread anywhere, or just as neat and tidy as usual?
    Do you feel sort of upset to figure out from bunch of wires which line is which at the back of the TV set?... That is the job of this work. To remove wires and cables from the region of high data rate communications in 10 meters.
    anonymous