Google

Google took a simple concept - text keywords - and became an Internet leader. In most markets, Google has the search market share lead and management is looking to expand into new markets. The search giant hasn't quite found its next big hit, but Google Apps and Android are promising extensions of the business. The game plan for Google: Expand into new markets like mobile and grow advertising revenue. Google is also dabbling in everything from broadband to power management to alternative energy. The company is well positioned to benefit from cloud computing and the consumerization of IT.

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Walt Mossberg: What's new in tech this holiday season?

At a Churchill Club event, ZDNet talked with Wall Street Journal personal technology columnist Walt Mossberg. He showed us some new gadgets for the holidays, including the new Barnes & Noble Nook; Bayer's new USB-enabled diabetic monitor; the iLane, a portable e-mail messaging device for your car; and the Acer Netbook running Google's Android OS.

December 4, 2009

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Apple's app flap: Don't blame AT&T

ZDNet Senior Editor Sam Diaz shares his views on the recent iPhone related controversy--Apple’s rejection of Google Voice. He says, AT&T was not behind the app rejection and that Apple should adopt it because it has already approved other VoIP apps such as Skype.

August 10, 2009

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Which smartphone platform should developers aim for?

For start-ups without a lot of time or money, is it smarter to develop for the iPhone first or the Android OS? Panelists at the AlwaysOn Summit at Stanford discuss the pros and cons of each platform. With 65,000 apps available, the iPhone may be the most popular smartphone, but that also means that many more apps can eclipse yours. Panelists include Purnima Kochikar, vice president of the Nokia Community and Developer Forum; Dorrian Porter, CEO of Mozes; Simon Khalaf, CEO of Flurry; and moderator Mark Newhall, co-founder of IdealWave Solutions and INmobile.org.

July 30, 2009

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Open-source bonuses for the big guys

At the AlwaysOn Summit at Stanford University, panelists discuss benefits that huge companies like Google and Facebook could get from embracing open source, such as third-party developers integrating their products into new application versions and easier connectivity with emerging technologies. Panelists include Ron Yekutiel, CEO of Kaltura; Kim Polese, CEO of SpikeSource; and moderator Matt Asay, vice president of business development at Alfresco and a member of the CNET Blog Network.

July 30, 2009

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Beyond Google AdSense: Monetizing smaller Web sites

What can small companies and start-ups without huge audience numbers do to earn money from their Web sites? At the Revenue Bootcamp Conference in Mountain View, Calif., panelists discuss pay-per-click ads, and why they might not be the best model for small companies. Rather, they say, finding a single sponsor or targeting a more specific audience could be a better strategy. Panelists include: Neil Chase, vice president of Author Services at Federated Media; Samir Arora, chairman and CEO of Glam Media; and David Kopp, senior director of North American ads at Yahoo. Moderator: Bill Reichert, managing director of Garage Technology Ventures.

July 14, 2009

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The month ahead: How the iPhone 3GS is faring

With earnings season looming, ZDNet correspondent Sumi Das and senior editor Sam Diaz look ahead at July and discuss what's on deck for the big four: Apple, Yahoo, Google, and Microsoft. We all know ad spending has tapered, but what does that mean for Google? And will Windows 7 carry Microsoft through the recession?

July 2, 2009

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Google CEO touts always-on computing

At the Google I/O developer's conference in San Francisco, Calif., company CEO Eric Schmidt shares his vision for a new computing paradigm. In his keynote, Schmidt says "this is the beginning of the real win of cloud computing, of applications."

May 27, 2009

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Wolfram Alpha: First hands-on

CNET's Rafe Needleman gets a look at the eagerly-anticipated new computational search engine, Wolfram Alpha. Is it a Google killer? No, but it has the potential to change the way we view at data on the Web.

May 15, 2009

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Search space becomes more crowded

All the Web content in the world is useless, if you can't find what you're looking for, right? ZDNet correspondent Sumi Das talks to senior editor Sam Diaz about new search services and features that aren't necessarily going toe to toe with Google, but may prove to be disrupters for the search giant.

May 12, 2009

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RIM shines on Wall Street--for now

ZDNet Senior Editor Sam Diaz talks about Research In Motion's recent praise from UBS analyst Jeffrey Fan and whether his notes are merited. Diaz believes the company's successful first-quarter was due to some special promotions and that the second quarter will be a better gauge of RIM's long-term health as competition in the smartphone market heats up.

May 7, 2009

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