Video: DET considers Linux on the desktop

Video: DET considers Linux on the desktop

Summary: The NSW Department of Education and Training (DET) may increase the penetration of Linux on its 165,000 desktop fleet because open source is "clearly an industry trend".In the fourth and final part of this interview, Tim Anderson, Information Services Director, claims that there are an increasing number of innovative open source solutions for the education sector and Linux on the desktop is being taken seriously.

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The NSW Department of Education and Training (DET) may increase the penetration of Linux on its 165,000 desktop fleet because open source is "clearly an industry trend".

In the fourth and final part of this interview, Tim Anderson, Information Services Director, claims that there are an increasing number of innovative open source solutions for the education sector and Linux on the desktop is being taken seriously.

"We have to consider [open source] very seriously because it is clearly an industry trend. We need to have genuine competition in the marketplace for desktops ... a lot of innovative educational solutions are coming out of the open source area.

"The possibility of running Linux-based desktop platforms is real for us," said Anderson.

Other parts of this interview can be found here:
Part 1: DET begins slow crawl to a new Vista
Part 2: DET mulls Vista savings, training
Part 3: Licence costs may delay DET Vista plans
Part 4: DET considers Linux on the desktop

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Topics: Government, Government AU, Microsoft, Windows

Munir Kotadia

About Munir Kotadia

Munir first became involved with online publishing in 1998 when he joined ZDNet UK and later moved into print publishing as Chief Reporter for IT Week, part of ZDNet UK, a weekly trade newspaper targeted at Enterprise IT managers. He later moved back into online publishing as Senior News Reporter for ZDNet UK.

Munir was recognised as Australia's Best Technology Columnist at the 5th Annual Sun Microsystems IT Journalism Awards 2007. In the previous year he was named Best News Journalist at the Consensus IT Writers Awards.

He no longer uses his Commodore 64.

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Talkback

7 comments
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  • Linux/Open source is the future

    Vista is a big disappointment for me personally. Very demanding on hardware and doesn't provide any real new features over Windows XP. And I more and more believe it is open source software that is the real future. They are developing very very fast and the freedom they give to (and ensure for) the users is also very important. Availability of the source code is also very important. Openness and freedom along with software diversity should play a much biger role in education. Currently our schools are way too much in the hands of Microsoft monopoly.
    anonymous
  • These videos

    Ironically considerig the subject, I can't view this video on a Linux desktop, because they will only play on Flashplayer v8 and above and the latest version for Linux is only v7...

    This is the sort of problem DET will have to address when running Linux desktops. Vendors may say they support Linux, but the Linux versions of the software often lag behind those for the "mainstream" platforms (i.e. MS Windows)...
    anonymous
  • Ahhh...wrong.

    I can see them just fine...with Flashplayer 9 on my linux desktop using Firefox

    Do try to keep up..

    Next !!!!
    anonymous
  • Ah you must mean the beta pre-release version

    of Flashplayer from the Adobe Labs website - the one that's not listed on the Adobe download site. I did eventually find it and it does work. But it's a manual install which involves copying the libflashplayer.so shared object to the plugins directory (which was not in the suggested location). Sure it works, but it's not something your average user is going to be able to manage or even attempt. I think my point about support for linux apps being a bit behind the "mainstream" is still valid...
    anonymous
  • Something to go along with this

    http://techstuff.goboardz.com/forum_topic.asp?ID=1225
    anonymous
  • Wrong again

    Sorry, but it's not "mainstream" stuff that Open Source is having trouble with keeping up to. It's proprietary stuff they can't keep up with. Moving targets are hard to hit.
    If people only used open standards for things, then this would never be an issue.... Want a linux "flash" player? Easy... Check the standard and write one (or get someone to write it for you).
    anonymous
  • Remember when Apple had a stranglehold on school computers before Microsoft got it's multi-million kick-off from the IBM PC?

    There was a whole generation of Mac-indoctrinated students who had difficulty with the concept of entering instructions via the keyboard--and now Windows is guilty of the same trend.

    Get these students running a Linux platform, use OpenOffice--and for those complaining about whether or not open-source is mainstream enough, the movie, Avatar, was rendered on a cluster of four very-average-hardware linux boxes. I think open source has come of age, so save some of those funds.
    Treknology