Video: Kernel developers are 'unfriendly', says Torvalds

Video: Kernel developers are 'unfriendly', says Torvalds

Summary: Part four of our interview sees Linus Torvalds explain why it is getting more difficult to attract new blood to the kernel development process

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The kernel development community can be "unfriendly", according to Linus Torvalds. In this three-minute video, the Linux guru talks about why it is getting more difficult to bring in new blood.

At Linux.conf.au in Sydney, Linus Torvalds talked about why attracting new kernel developers is getting more difficult as "obvious" flaws — and solutions to those flaws — fade away.

"It's a lot harder to enter the kernel development process today than it was five or 10 years ago. Over the years, one of the sad parts is we have got so much better that it has raised the bar. There are no problems that the person can see as an obvious problem and an obvious solution," he said.

"We have had other issues. Sometimes the kernel community is not the friendliest community and I don't like that. It sometimes scares away people. That said... we do seem to have a lot of people who find it an exciting area and are not afraid of a bit of controversy on the kernel mailing list," said Torvalds.

To all Linux users: this video is presented in Flash 8 and has been tested successfully for use with Linux systems running the latest Flash plug-in for Linux (ver. 9.0). Currently, this version is not available from Adobe for those running 64-bit Linux.

Topics: Apps, Software Development

Munir Kotadia

About Munir Kotadia

Munir first became involved with online publishing in 1998 when he joined ZDNet UK and later moved into print publishing as Chief Reporter for IT Week, part of ZDNet UK, a weekly trade newspaper targeted at Enterprise IT managers. He later moved back into online publishing as Senior News Reporter for ZDNet UK.

Munir was recognised as Australia's Best Technology Columnist at the 5th Annual Sun Microsystems IT Journalism Awards 2007. In the previous year he was named Best News Journalist at the Consensus IT Writers Awards.

He no longer uses his Commodore 64.

About

Chris started his journalistic adventure in 2006 as the Editor of Builder AU after originally joining CBS as a programmer. After a Canadian sojourn, he returned in 2011 as the Editor of TechRepublic Australia, and is now the Australian Editor of ZDNet.

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