Users-to-tech support ratio

Users-to-tech support ratio

Summary: How many employees should one tech support staff person oversee?CNET's Justine Nguyen explains the golden ratio of users to tech support staff, and what factors contribute to it.

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Topics: IT Employment, Hardware, Laptops, Operating Systems, Software

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  • Users to Tech support ratio

    This is an interesting article!!
    viruser
    • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

      Yeah, even I would like to know the definition of Tech Support!!! Does it include System, Network, Project Management, Level 1 & 2 desk side support, patch management, domain admin, user creation, Helpdesk, etc?
      Baskarraj
  • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

    What or where does the original rule of thumb come from? What metrics are used to pull that number out of the ether? Also, what is the definition of destop technician? System Admins included in that? This ratio has been the holy grail for me. I see little uniformity in the ratios that people are espousing. Dose this include the help desk support techs?
    ahendrian@...
  • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

    I don't see how she got the final number of 125:1.
    I'm computing it at 110:1 with everything factored in. Am I missing something?

    Mary Ann Krebs
    Manager of Support
    Harvard Kennedy School
    selkiedee
    • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

      @selkiedee The Negative applied if you had no Standards. The remaining were tools and standards to increase the ratio, so the negative was never applied to the original Ratio.
      GarlynSav
  • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

    This was a very short and sweet video on how to increase your ratio or user to tech. Typically what we encounter is the Technician expected to do it all! Complete support for anything electronic from computers to telephone to cell phones, not to mention server support, Virus support, VPN, plus we have to keep up with new technologies. What about projects they just expect it to get done plus everything else you need to keep up with.
    jtaylor1007
  • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

    What about the ratio of tech support at a high school level where each employee has about 125 students using desktops and mobile lab computers? I support only 180 employees, but almost 1,750 students as well.
    techsupport201
  • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

    I'd like to see the impact of cell phones on that ratio. Especially the difference between cell platforms Blackberry/iPhone/Droid/Windows/non-smartphones.
    john.alexander@...
  • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

    I'd like to see the impact of cell phones on that ratio. Especially the difference between cell platforms Blackberry/iPhone/Droid/Windows/non-smartphones.
    john.alexander@...
  • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

    gerald.fields@jax.ufl.edu
    skinnyg
  • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

    gerald.fields@jax.ufl.edu
    skinnyg
  • RE: Users-to-tech support ratio

    A linear formula is not appropriate for this equation. Consider upper and lower bounds for evidence.<br><br>If a company has 125 employees, a single tech is not sufficient to support all the desktop and servers. Let's say the tech is like a superhero and can single-handedly field all requests from all 125 employees with no help, patch all the servers, fix all the broken hardware, install all the required software, all by his or herself while he or she is there. What happens when he or she gets sick or goes on vacation?<br><br>On the other hand, 1000 techs for 125,000 employees seems extraordinarly excessive. You would have a couple hundred techs with nothing to do! As servers scale out, they only require a fraction of the support. Ten identical servers do not need much more support than one server. Ten completely different servers, on the other hand, is a different story entirely. Even for end user support, the scale matters. Supporting one sales person versus 100 people in a sales department does not scale up linearly for tech support.<br><br>Only in the middle does it make sense. Ten to 50 techs for 1,250 to 6,250 users seems fairly appropriate. <br><br>So, basically, this formula is bunk for all but between, say, 500 to 7,000 users.<br><br>A logarithmic formula would seem to be more appropriate. I have yet to find one that actually makes sense and works -- even within a fairly wide margin of error and unknowns. Every formula I've found for calculating IT support work-hours looks to be just made up out of thin air and not applicable to scales outside the size of the company the person who made it up works for.<br><br>I can't blame the presenter for not knowing the answer for all organization sizes. But at the same time, she should not present this as a formula every company can use, especially in the small business block. I feel bad for the admin of a 100 employee company that can't ever take any time off and works 16 hour days due to his boss watching this.
    Parrotlover77