Vista - Is It Some Sort of Drug?

Vista - Is It Some Sort of Drug?

Summary: The strangest thing has happened. I have known since the Vista disk in my Lifebook S6510 got corrupted and wouldn't boot that I would have to reload it before SP1 comes out.

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TOPICS: Linux
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The strangest thing has happened. I have known since the Vista disk in my Lifebook S6510 got corrupted and wouldn't boot that I would have to reload it before SP1 comes out. Last night I decided that I probably had enough time to do that, so I swapped the XP drive out and the Vista drive in, and booted up the Fujitsu Vista Recovery DVD. That all went very smoothly, and within an hour or so I was up and running with Vista in exactly the state it had been when the Lifebook was delivered. That's pretty impressive.

Then I started loading all of my basic software - Firefox, Thunderbird, ooVoo, SightSpeed, Gizmo and so on. The more I worked with it, just getting that stuff loaded, the more I realized that I really LIKE the way this thing runs with Vista. I can't put my finger on it; it's not only the "Aero" user interface, and it's certainly not any faster than it runs with XP Pro. It's almost like an addiction... I want it, but I can't tell you why. I think this is a large part of the reason why I have kept saying over and over again, I really WANT Vista to work, to be better than XP, or at least as good, at least as fast and reliable.

Maybe Microsoft has slipped some of that subliminal mind-control software into the Aero interface... it's taking control of me... I have to have it...

No! This disk is coming out again this evening, as soon as I do a bit of testing with the Wireless-N connection, because I've updated the firmware in the router since I last had Vista running. But then it's coming out, and I'm going back to XP until SP1 is available. I swear!

jw 7/4/2008

Topic: Linux

J.A. Watson

About J.A. Watson

I started working with what we called "analog computers" in aircraft maintenance with the United States Air Force in 1970. After finishing military service and returning to university, I was introduced to microprocessors and machine language programming on Intel 4040 processors. After that I also worked on, operated and programmed Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-8, PDP-11 (/45 and /70) and VAX minicomputers. I was involved with the first wave of Unix-based microcomputers, in the early '80s. I have been working in software development, operation, installation and support since then.

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