What should be in Singapore's localized Creative Commons?

What should be in Singapore's localized Creative Commons?

Summary: A while back, the government was all for nurturing creativity in Singapore--so the news of the Creative Commons must have sounded a good step in that direction.The last week of July saw the announcement that Singapore will launch its localized version of the Creative Commons.

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TOPICS: Legal
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A while back, the government was all for nurturing creativity in Singapore--so the news of the Creative Commons must have sounded a good step in that direction.

The last week of July saw the announcement that Singapore will launch its localized version of the Creative Commons. A Creative Commons license is based on the "some rights reserved" concept. It gives the copyright owner the ability to dictate how others may exercise the copyright rights, such as the right of others to copy the work, make derivative works or adaptations, to distribute and/or make money from the work. It does not give one the ability to restrict anything that is otherwise permitted by exceptions or limitations to copyright--including, importantly, fair use or fair dealing--and it does not give one the ability to control anything that is not protected by copyright law, such as facts and ideas. The Creative Commons license is also non-exclusive, meaning that the copyright owner is permitted to license the same work to other parties.

There are different variants of Creative Commons licenses. The Creative Commons Web site features the words "Share, Remix, Reuse-Legally".

In order to do so, Creative Commons licenses have one similar feature of the rights that are reserved--attribution, which means the copyright owner lets people copy, distribute, display, perform and remix the copyrighted work, as long as they give him credit the way he requests. In addition, copyright owners can select to allow non-commercial use, creation of derivative works such as remixes.

So, the question I have for Singapore readers is--what do you think makes a good candidate for the Singapore edition of Creative Commons? I think ideally you would want to include a work which benefits greatly from communal input. My initial choices would be-–school exam papers, army songs, Singapore songs and lecture notes.

Topic: Legal

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