Why I ordered a Nexus 7 tablet

Why I ordered a Nexus 7 tablet

Summary: The new tablet by Google is not ground-breaking, but is a good value for what you get in the little box.

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TOPICS: Google, Android, Tablets
48

Google Nexus 7 tablet
Like many enthusiasts I watched Google's unveiling of the Nexus 7 tablet to see what the company's first branded tablet would offer. While impressed, my reaction wasn't to run out and order one. After careful thought, that has changed and I have ordered a Nexus 7 tablet with 16 GB of storage.

I have no shortage of tablets here in Mobile News Manor so the last thing I need is another one. My current stable has the following tablets:

  • Asus Transformer Prime
  • Apple iPad (4G, 64 GB)
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab (original 7-inch with 3G)
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1
  • BlackBerry Playbook

I use these tablets for my work as they allow me to keep up with the latest Android/iOS developments. They also allow me to test apps as they appear, to track the apps available by platform. That's the official line, the fact is I like using tablets. A lot.

So why am I adding a Nexus 7 to this already crowded tablet collection? I can break it down into three areas.

The Nexus 7 hardware is outstanding for a 7-inch tablet, and is easily the best value available currently. The state-of-the-art hardware components are worth the $199/$249 for the 8GB/16GB Nexus 7. 

Another big factor behind my purchase is the inclusion of Jelly Bean, aka Android 4.1. While it looks to be an incremental upgrade over Ice Cream Sandwich, it is the latest and greatest version of Android. I need to get my hands on Jelly Bean to follow the progress Google is making with Android.

The last reason for my Nexus 7 order is due to the form factor. The Galaxy Tab and Playbook have proven to me how convenient the smaller tablet is for reading ebooks in particular, and for consuming media in general. It is easier to carry than larger siblings, and much more comfortable in the hand for extended periods.

Put those reasons together and you have an order for a 16GB Nexus 7. Maybe my affection for tablets is a sickness, I am willing to admit that possibility. I do use tablets quite heavily, so no matter the reason I will get good use out of the Nexus 7 when it arrives in the quoted 2-3 weeks.

Topics: Google, Android, Tablets

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48 comments
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  • It does look interesting...

    I have a tablet (10 in Acer Iconia A500 with ICS) so I won't be purchasing another), but my girlfriend has been asking about one (she was thinking Kindle Fire ) and now with this device and it's $199 price tag, it would seem like this might be the nice happy medium. We may wait just a bit to make sure we can get all the accessories (and priced reasonably due to competition) that she might want/need.
    Please let us know what you think of the size and Jellybean as soon as you have had a chance to use it for a few days and get a feel for it's overall value and features.
    jkohut
    • Amazon offers free books for prime members for Kindle

      Nexus does not....
      Donmotobike
      • But...

        Nexus has pretty much everything else the Fire does not have. Hi Def screen, quad-core CPU, 12 core GPU, pure Droid power (not Amazon's fire version) to name a few.
        RoseRiveter
        • Really it comes down to:

          Are you buying it to read books, or because you want a tablet. If you want a 7" tablet that can also read books, Nexus will probably be your choice. If you want a 7" e-reader that can also perform tablet functions, the Fire will probably be your choice. The Fire is an amazing device if you will primarily be reading books, but also want to have the option to hop on the web or play with some apps. Note, SOME apps, because you don't have the full Play store. The Nexus seems like it'll be more of a full-fledged tablet that happens to be the same size as the Fire.
          dsa791
      • Nexus can run the kindle app

        So, the nexus does indeed enjoy pretty much all the benefits of the fire.
        schuster.aj
    • I have the original transformer

      I will still be getting a few of these. It is too cool to pass up for Christmas for the kids. We have two Kindle Fires also and like Amazon but they are limited by Amazon's desire for control of the ecosystem. I have a lot of Google play apps too. Since you can put the Amazon app store and Kindle reader on the Nexus we can have both.
      symbolset
  • Hmm

    As much as I want one, I will probably wait for the Asus Infinity as that certainly seems to be the big dog of Android Tablets.
    slickjim
    • 10 inch Android tablet

      If you don't have one yet, that is the one to get.
      symbolset
    • Infinity price $$$$

      Infinity will cost too much IMO. You would probably be better off getting the 300 instead of the infinity if you just need a 10 incher. The nexus 200 dollar price point is cool for the 7 inch.
      Kilo Juliet
  • At least compare specs. Author has a screw loose...

    The BlackBerry PlayBook is currently the best value, hands down.

    PlayBook:
    10hr battery vs 8 (more if just playing video)
    3Mpixel front camera vs 1.2!
    5Mpixel rear camera vs none
    16GB for $199
    32GB for $249
    Stereo microphones
    Forward facing stereo speakers
    Micro hdmi out, up to 1080p - this is a killer feature. We hook one of our 4 PBs to our LCD TV and stream content.

    Here's a good read:
    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/mobile-gadgeteer/forget-the-amazon-kindle-fire-the-bb-playbook-is-now-the-best-low-cost-tablet/5498
    sagec
    • Read the article

      I already have a Playbook, and agree it's a good value. But it's not just about specs for tablets, the ecosystem (apps, content) and user experience factor in heavily.
      JamesKendrick
      • I read the article. As I said, you have a screw loose

        "and is easily the best value available currently"

        Sorry, the PlayBook hardware alone beats the Nexus in 8 categories, two of which are NO SHOWS on the Nexus.

        That does not add up to "best available".

        I push my PlayBook hard. Not ONCE has it needed more than 2 CPU cores. The screen resolution is already so good (better than iPad 2), why would I want more battery sucking pixels.
        sagec
    • The Nexus 7 has better specs

      sagec: Interesting how you leave off that the Nexus 7 has a Tegra 3 quad core CPU and 1280x800 IPS display while the Playbook has a dual core CPU and 1024x600 non-IPS display. Playbook is last generation hardware. Nexus is current generation. Also, the Nexus 7 is lighter and thinner than the Playbook.
      babyfacemagee
      • true

        the nexus has the newest stuff out there. The only thing im on the fence about is the Tegra 3, I dont typically like Nvidia and my experience with a couple other Tegra tablets proved them to be slow.
        Jimster480
        • Used a Tegra 3 for a few weeks

          I used a Tegra 3 based TF300 for a few weeks and overall it was very quick... the only problem with stutter seemed to come from he hand off of the 500 MHz core to the faster cores when waking the tablet up but I suspect that wasn't really optimized for ICS.
          slickjim
          • The CPU was not really optimized for ICS

            Since when we optimize hardware to software and not the other way around?
            danbi
          • Not exactly what I meant

            I Meant that feature might not of had he best support in ICS. As in ICS might not be fully optimized for the power saving core.
            slickjim
        • Not exactly "newest"...

          The guts are virtually identical to the Transformer Prime, TF300 and the upcoming TF700 other than the screen size compared to the Prime or TF300 and resolution compare to the TF700. The Nexus 7 is even made by Asus and they could have easily put their own label on it and sold it as a member of their existing lineup.

          That's not to criticize it. Its just to say its nothing particularly new. You could say it's basically a Transformer Prime without the keyboard dock and with a smaller screen and plastic case instead of aluminum.
          cornpie
          • More convenient package

            And only $200. That about covers it. And that's a lot.
            symbolset
      • The Nexus does have a higher resolution screen and a quad core CPU. So?

        Sorry, the PlayBook hardware alone beats the Nexus in 8 categories, two of which are NO SHOWS on the Nexus.

        Read my list and do a side-by-side comparison.

        Plus, I'll take TI hardware ANY day over NVIDIA.
        sagec