Will 2010 be a fizzler?

Will 2010 be a fizzler?

Summary: 2009 was a busy year in telecommunications and this year is shaping up for even more change. Or will some of the big promises start to fizzle out?

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TOPICS: NBN, Broadband, Telcos
11

2009 was a busy year in telecommunications and this year is shaping up for even more change. Or will some of the big promises start to fizzle out?

Some of the big questions for 2010 are:

  • Will the government succeed in driving the structural change it announced in 2009?

  • Will we see the National Broadband Network build commence, or will it just generate more hot air (and add to global warming!)?

  • Will an election throw the kibosh on the government's plans? This week and next on Twisted Wire we ask some of the industry's key influencers what changes they expect in 2010.

Today Ann Hurley, CEO of the Communications Alliance paints a positive picture for the NBN, but predicts more change in the structure of the industry.

David Havyatt from Havyatt Associates says there's a concern that politics might force the government to rush its thinking on the NBN, which could cause the wrong decisions to be made. But the big challenge for the industry, he says, is in the mobile space. Find out why by spending half an hour of your life listening in to this week's episode of Twisted Wire.

Add your predictions for the year in the Talkback section at the end of this post.

Next week: Internode's Simon Hackett and Cisco's Kevin Bloch give their predictions for 2010.

Topics: NBN, Broadband, Telcos

About

Phil Dobbie has a wealth of radio and business experience. He started his career in commercial radio in the UK and, since coming to Australia in 1991, has held senior marketing and management roles with Telstra, OzEmail, the British Tourist Authority and other telecommunications, media, travel and advertising businesses.

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Talkback

11 comments
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  • Telstra V NBN. Competition at its best.

    While I do not know all the facts of the NBN plans for the future could I suggest that to solve the problems of the past (opponents claiming Telstra is a monopoly etc) Telstra proceed with its own FTTN network, thereby providing competition for the NBN and allowing the ACCC to relax its need to continually place restrictions on Telstra.
    anonymous
  • Telstra V NBN. Competition at its best.

    Sydney Lawrence: "Telstra proceed with its own FTTN network"

    They are. http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/communications/soa/Govt-Telstra-shake-on-customer-transfer/0,130061791,339300121,00.htm

    Sydney Lawrence: "thereby providing competition for the NBN"

    Telstra have never shown any interest in being competitive? Just because David Thodey is now holding the reigns doesn't mean Telstra will change anytime soon.

    From another point, it'd be nice if we could have Telstra compete with the NBN, it could lead to lower prices for consumers, but having multiple parallel FTTP networks is not viable in Australia's population density.
    anonymous
  • FTTN is outdated technology

    You are such a "crock" Lawrence as Telstra have gotten over wanting to build a FTTN. They now have no desire to invest in outdated technology (fiber to the node) and are actually looking forward to co-operating with the government and NBN Co in the progress/deployment of the NBN.

    Just move on Lawrence, the Telstra of "OLD" is gone. Long live the NBN
    anonymous
  • Telstra V NBN. Competition at its best.

    I apologise Lawrence, I misread FTTN as FTTP. I feel my points of Telstra being anti-competitive and parallel fibre networks not currently being viable in Australia are still correct.
    anonymous
  • 2010 a fizzler? Not by a long shot

    2010 is already gearing up to be just as engaging as 2009. First on the agenda is Conroy's cretinous censorship crusade - the public must go out of its way to make noise on this issue. This one issue alone is big enough for this year in my opinion.

    Also, I think as the year progresses, more and more people will begin to perceive a complete and utter lack of progress on the NBN. If Rudd goes to the next election without some tangible accomplishments, he's going to cop quite a bit of stick during the campaign.

    In regards to Telstra, I recall reading not too long ago that their focus was on flogging off their upgraded HFC assets (which are more obsolete than FTTN) as a "national high speed network." I'm sorry, but Sydney, Melbourne, and bugger all of the rest of the country does not constitute a national network.
    anonymous
  • @ Telstra V NBN (at top)

    Sydney you are doing it again - now for about the 4th time (you are remembering to take the tablets?)...

    One day saying that you hope and believe Telstra will negotiate (with the government) a win/win for the "Australian nation"! Then days later advocating Telstra vs. the "Australian nation".

    Telstra exchange, SL 5/1 "Despite the enormous complexities of the situation I believe that as an Australian Icon, Telstra will negotiate a win, win result for the Australian Nation, customers, employees and the 1,400,000 Australians who own the Company" {END}.

    Don't forget all those "foreigners who own "the icon" [sic, lol] too Sydney". Or are they not "your kind of people"?

    Then today (above/top) SL ...'could I suggest that to solve the problems of the past (opponents claiming Telstra is a monopoly etc) Telstra proceed with its own FTTN network, thereby providing competition for the NBN' {END}

    FFS Sydney, we know it's a woman's prerogative to change her mind, but...

    This is becoming even more farcical than your I have no TLS shares - oh that's right, yes I do have shares after-all, lies.
    anonymous
  • Ben

    The benefits which the improvements in technology will bring to Australia will become moot if the Internet censorship policy gets through.

    The government has not a clue how compatible the censorware are with the NBN, and it will be an unhappy surprise for everyone.

    There is a bucketload of unanswered technical questions:

    1. How does the censorware work with IPv6?
    2. Will high traffic sites be exempt?
    3. How much traffic can the censorware process until they completely fail
    4. Will the censorware be required to filter 'secure' website, thus undermining the digital economy?

    Plus many more.
    anonymous
  • Concentrate hard RS.

    RS, and with any respect that may be due, you continue to display your poor grasp of the written word and the operational meaning of the English language.

    My preference, as you would know, and remember, if your attention span and memory capacity was not of a low level, has always been for negotiations between Telstra and NBN with the hope of a "win,win" result.

    If a satisfactory conclusion cannot be attained then Telstra must move in other directions. Simple really RS but then again this suggestion may not suit your secret, hidden and Anti Telstra agenda.
    anonymous
  • No agenda hidden or otherwise, as opposed to you, greedy shareholder

    Sydney, as soon as you take an actual position on comms, rather than, I don't care what happens to anyone else or Australia "as long as my more precious than life itselff Telstra shares, increase in value", you may actually gain more than the current 0 credibility you have. You then perhaps, may even be able to actually add something, anything of substance to the debate.

    But until then, enjoy wallowing in your own little dream land, where Telstra are the Icon who live in a gingerbread castle and you are the handsome Prince who will save them.

    Keep rehashing all those Solunatic and Dr Phillip flopper lies (the ones Telstra are desperately trying to distance themself from, lol). Lies invented at NWAT, to rally the thought challenged and greedy TLS shareholder into mounting an online campaign of FUD and out and out lies...

    God Bless (my) Telstra (shares), eh Syd!
    anonymous
  • Ahem, actually the word is "FIZZER"

    Where did you go to school, assuming you did, of course?
    anonymous
  • I sense a lot of negative energy

    I did go to school, thanks. Tell me, have you got many friends?
    anonymous