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£15 Raspberry Pi survives Quake

The UK-based charity Raspberry Pi, which hopes to supply schools worldwide with ultra-low-cost computers, has shown off the current version of its $25 computer running Quake 3.The device itself is only about the size of a credit card and is designed to connect to a PC, monitor, or a touchscreen to create a cheap tablet.

The UK-based charity Raspberry Pi, which hopes to supply schools worldwide with ultra-low-cost computers, has shown off the current version of its $25 computer running Quake 3.

The device itself is only about the size of a credit card and is designed to connect to a PC, monitor, or a touchscreen to create a cheap tablet.

Key provisional specs of the tiny device include a 700MHz ARM11 processor, up to 256MB of SDRAM, composite and HDMI outputs, USB-support and memory card slots. It is also intended to arrive with an optional integrated USB hub, ethernet port, and open source software, such as Ubuntu, KOffice, and Iceweasel, pre-installed.

Despite the modest spec list and its focus on educational use, the team posted a video of the system comfortably managing to run Quake 3 on maximum settings on Saturday.

"Obviously, the Raspberry Pi isn't intended as a gaming platform, but it's very satisfying to let the Broadcom BCM2835 application processor off the leash and see what it can do in this sphere nonetheless," the charity said on its blog.

However, the demonstrator in the video (below) noted that the frame rate was not as good as its potential, citing a potential floating-point library issue.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_mDuJuvZjI

Raspberry Pi hopes that it will be able to deliver the computers, fully configured, to schools for just $25 (£15) per unit. It also plans to introduce a slightly more expensive $35 model, which includes the optional ethernet port and USB hub. Raspberry Pi currently estimates that the first devices will be available to buy from November.